Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" fine frenzy ' which he ascribes to the poet, — a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just ; but the premises are false. After the first suppositions have... "
Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature - Page 431
1844
Full view - About this book

Essays on Milton and Addison

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1902 - 315 pages
...fine frenzy, doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to 10 poetry; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just; but the...suppositions require a degree of credulity which almost 15 amounts to a partial and temporary derangement of the intellect. Hence of all people children are...
Full view - About this book

Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1903 - 226 pages
...indeed, is essential to poetry; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are 20 jn^r; hut thf premises are false. After the first suppositions have...partial and temporary derangement of the intellect. 25 Hence of all<^eqple/vrii1f1rprjQrp the most imaginative. They abandonttlemselves without reserve...
Full view - About this book

Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review ..., Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1903
...just j but the premises are false,. After tne first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to consistent ; but those first suppositions require...imaginative. They abandon themselves without reserve" lcTl:veryulusion. Every image which is strongly presented to their mental eye produces on them the...
Full view - About this book

Essay on Milton

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1903 - 160 pages
...a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just ; but the...false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent; but those 15 first suppositions require a degree of credulity which...
Full view - About this book

Milton. Machiavelli. Hallam's Constitutional history. Southey's Colloquies ...

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1903
...doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth ofjnoadngsj. The reasonings are just ; but the premises are false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent; but those first suppositions require a degree of credulity which...
Full view - About this book

Pamphlets in Philology and the Humanities, Volume 12

Animal behavior - 1892
...pleasure ought to be called unsoundness.' Again : ' Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry, but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just, but the...of all people, children are the most imaginative. . . . No man, whatever his sensibility may be, is ever affected by Hamlet or Lear as a little girl...
Full view - About this book

Essay on Milton

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1914 - 128 pages
...a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just; but the...degree of credulity which almost amounts to a partial 10 and temporary derangement of the intellect. Hence of all people children are the most imaginative....
Full view - About this book

The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition

Meyer Howard Abrams - Social Science - 1971 - 406 pages
...can write or even enjoy poetry 'without a certain unsoundness of mind.' The truth of poetry is 'the truth of madness. The reasonings are just; but the premises are false.' We cannot unite the incompatible advantages of reality and deception, the clear discernment .of truth...
Limited preview - About this book

Geschichte der Literaturkritik, 1750-1950, Volume 2

René Wellek - Criticism - 1977 - 381 pages
...89: »...an art to produce an illusion on the imagination...« »Those first suppositions [of poetry] require a degree of credulity which almost amounts...partial and temporary derangement of the intellect.« 9. E, i, 196: »Our judgement ripens, our imagination decays.« Seite 199: ». . .strongest in savages,...
Limited preview - About this book

Poetry and Prophecy: The Beginnings of a Literary Tradition

James L. Kugel - Poetry - 1990 - 251 pages
...poetry, without a certain unsoundness of mind. . . . Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry, but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just; but the premises are false. . . . Poetry produces an illusion on the eye of the mind, as a magic lantern produces an illusion on...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF