Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" fine frenzy ' which he ascribes to the poet, — a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just ; but the premises are false. After the first suppositions have... "
Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature - Page 431
1844
Full view - About this book

"Elocutionary Manual.": The Principles of Elocution, with Exercises and ...

Alexander Melville Bell - Elocution - 1878 - 243 pages
...the imagination, the art of doing by means of words what the painter does by means of colours. ness. The reasonings are just, but the premises are false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent, but those first suppositions require a degree of credulity which...
Full view - About this book

The Principles of Elocution: With Exercises and Notations for Pronunciation ...

Alexander Melville Bell - Elocution - 1878 - 243 pages
...reasonings are just, bat the premises are false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent, but those first suppositions require a degree of crednlitv which almost amounts to a partial and temporary derangement of the intellect. Hence of all...
Full view - About this book

An analysis of Locke's Essay on the human understanding, in the form of ...

Robert Cleary - 1878 - 221 pages
...chap. ii. t Cf. Macaulay, Essay on Milton ; — "Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just ; but the premises are false." conclude they are, as we fancy of ourselves, or have been taught by others to imagine. (Sect. 1 5.)...
Full view - About this book

The Catholic literary circular

...negative. In his Essay on Milton, he says : " Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just, but the...been made, everything ought to be consistent; but these suppositions require a degree of credulity which almost amounts to a partial and temporary derangement...
Full view - About this book

Critical, Historical, and Miscellaneous Essays and Poems, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English literature - 1882
...a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry ; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just ; but the...false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent ; but those first suppositions require a degree of credulity which...
Full view - About this book

Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review

Thomas Babington Macaulay - English literature - 1883 - 850 pages
...reasonings are just ; but the premises are false. After the first suppositions have been made, every thing ought to be consistent ; but those first suppositions...of the intellect. Hence of all people children are tliemost imaginative. They abandon themselves without reserve to every illusion. Every image which...
Full view - About this book

Macaulay's Milton, ed. to illustrate the laws of rhetoric and composition by ...

Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [essays], Milton.), Alexander Mackie - English language - 1884 - 179 pages
...not yet agreed as to what Poetry is. /. 17. — 'Truth, indeed, is essential to Poetry; but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just, but the premises are false.' This is quite in Macaulay's vein. He delights in such puzzling, epigrammatic, and seemingly contradictory...
Full view - About this book

Lord Macaulay's Essays and Lays of Ancient Rome

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1885 - 898 pages
...— a fine frenzy doubtless, but still a frenzy. Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry; but it is the every thing ought to be consistent ; but those first suppositions require a degree of credulity which...
Full view - About this book

A Dictionary of Quotations in Prose: From American and Foreign Authors ...

Anna Lydia Ward - Citations anglaises - 1889 - 701 pages
...much pleasure can be called unsoundness. . . . Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry, but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just, but the...partial and temporary derangement of the intellect. 4196 Macaulay : Essays. Milton. (Edinburgh Review, August, 1825.) The merit of poetry, in its wildest...
Full view - About this book

A Dictionary of Quotations in Prose: From American and Foreign Authors ...

Anna Lydia Ward - Citations anglaises - 1889 - 701 pages
...much pleasure can be called unsoundness. . . . Truth, indeed, is essential to poetry, but it is the truth of madness. The reasonings are just, but the...the first suppositions have been made, everything oxight to be consistent; but those first suppositions require a degree of credulity which almost amounts...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF