Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Mercury, New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your husband. — Look you now, what follows : Here is your husband ; like a mildew'd... "
The Tuftonian - Page 79
1900
Full view - About this book

Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical and ..., Volume 4

English drama - 1826
...act ? Ham. Look here, upon this picture, and on this ; The counterfeit presentment of two brothers. See what a grace was seated on this brow — Hyperion's...fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it love : for, at your age, The hey-day in the blood is tame,...
Full view - About this book

The Quarterly Theological Review and Ecclesiastical Record, Volume 3

Theology - 1826
...her abject credulity, and says, " what is there in England for which an American should envy her ? ' Have you eyes, Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ?' " It is impossible not to admire the amiable disposition which dictated these...
Full view - About this book

The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes ..., Part 25, Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1826
...you now, what follows : Here is your husband; like a mildew'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother 7 . Have you eyes ? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten 8 on this moor ? Ha! have you eyes ? You cannot call it, love: for, at your age, The hey-day in the...
Full view - About this book

Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1826
...you now, what follows : Here is your husband ; like a mildew'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother T. Have you eyes ? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten 8 on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it, love : for, at your age, The hey-day in the...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1826
...you now, what follows : Here is your husband ; like a mildew'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother r. Have you eyes ? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten 8 on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it, love : for, at your age, The hey-day in the...
Full view - About this book

The Beauties of Shakspeare Regularly Selected from Each Play. With a General ...

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 345 pages
...seal, To give the world assurance of a man: This was your husband.— Look you now, what foV lows: Here is your husband; like a mildew'd ear, Blasting...Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And battenlTon this moor? Ha! have you eyes? You cannot call it love; for, at your age, The hey-clay in...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1828
...you now, what follows : Here is your hushand ; like a mildew'd ear, Blast ing his wholesome hrother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And hatten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? Yon canuot call it, love : for, at your age, The hey-day in...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
...heaven-kissing hill ; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to stt his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your...Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten6 on this moor ? Ha! have you eyes ? You cannot call it, love : for, at your ağe, The hey-day...
Full view - About this book

A Glossary of North Country Words, in Use: With Their Etymology, and ...

John Trotter Brockett - English language - 1829 - 343 pages
...going and a battening to the bairn," is a common toast at the gossip's feast on the birth of a child. Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, and batten on this moor. — S/mk. Hamlet. BATTEN, or BATTIN, s. the straw of two sheaves folded together. I have been referred...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...Hyperion's curls ; the front of Jove himself; An eye like Mars, to threaten and command ; A station 4 like the herald Mercury, New-lighted on a heaven-kissing...fair mountain leave to feed, And batten* on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it, love : for, at your age, The heyday in the blood is tame,...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF