Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Mercury, New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your husband. — Look you now, what follows : Here is your husband ; like a mildew'd... "
The Tuftonian - Page 79
1900
Full view - About this book

Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 148 pages
...assurance of a man. This was your husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, 67 And batten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? You cannot call it love, for at your age 69 The heyday...
Limited preview - About this book

The Tragedie of Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...(Dict., sv 1) : To grow fat; to fatten (Scand.). Shakespeare has batten (Intrans.), Hamlet, III, iv, 67, ['Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed And batten on this moor']; but Milton has 'battening our flocks,' Lycidas, l. 29. Strictly, it is Intransitive. Icelandic: batna,...
Limited preview - About this book

Amleto

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 320 pages
...of a man. This was your husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband ; like a mildewed ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes?...fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? Ha! Have you eyes? You cannut call it love. For at your age The heyday in the blood is rame; it's humble,...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespearean Language: A Guide for Actors and Students

Leslie O'Dell - Performing Arts - 2002 - 269 pages
...designed to arouse intense reactions in listeners: Epiplexis: asking questions to chide or reprehend. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair Mountain leave to feed, And batten on this Moor? ha? Have you eyes? [Hamlet 3 .4.65] Other manipulations are more subtle, and structural in nature:...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare Survey, Volume 34

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 224 pages
...remember Hamlet's double-edged words to Gertrude, when he shows her the portraits of her two husbands: Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? (3.4.66-7) In fact, throughout the first scene of Othello, the Moor is presented in the traditional...
Limited preview - About this book

The Kendall/Hunt Anthology: Literature to Write About

K. H. Anthol - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 313 pages
...station like the herald Mercury New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill, A combination and a form indeed, 60 Where every god did seem to set his seal To give the...eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, 66 And batten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? You cannot call it love, for at your age The hey-day...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge Shakespeare Library

Catherine M. S. Alexander
...'see the inmost part' of herself, and cries, showing her the two portraits of his father and Claudius, Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? (m, iv, 65-7) She confesses, 'Thou turnst mine eyes into my very soul', but the...
Limited preview - About this book

The Ethics of Mourning: Grief and Responsibility in Elegiac Literature

R. Clifton Spargo - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 314 pages
...original: This "was your husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes?...fair mountain leave to feed And batten on this moor? Ha, have you eyes? (3.4.62-66) "Look you now what follows" refers, first of all, to the staged order...
Limited preview - About this book

The Poetics of Melancholy in Early Modern England

Douglas Trevor - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 252 pages
..."Have you eyes?" he asks his mother after comparing the true picture of grace with its counterfeit, "Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed / And batten on this moor? Ha, have you eyes?" (3.4.65-67). He continues: You cannot call it love; for at your age The heyday...
Limited preview - About this book

The Scandal of Images: Iconoclasm, Eroticism, and Painting in Early Modern ...

Marguerite A. Tassi - Drama - 2005 - 259 pages
...through ekphrasis — a debased image: Look you now what follows: Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes?...fair mountain leave to feed. And batten on this moor? ha, have you eyes? (3.4.63-67) Hamlet's vision of Claudius as a rotting head of corn upon which Gertrude...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF