Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]
[graphic]

THE NATIONAL

GEOGRAPHIC
MAGAZINE

INDEX

January to June, 1926

VOLUME XLIX

PUBLISHED BY THE

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY

HUBBARD, MEMORIAL HALL

WASHINGTON, D.C.

[blocks in formation]

345645

GEOGRAPHIC ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS

SIXTEENTH AND M STREETS NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, D. C.

GILBERT GROSVENOR, President JOHN OLIVER LA GORCE, Vice-President JOHN JOY EDSON, Treasurer

FRED M. BERTHRONG, Assistant Treasurer

HENRY WHITE, Vice-President

O. P. AUSTIN, Secretary
GEO. W. HUTCHISON, Associate Secretary
EDWIN P. GROSVENOR, General Counsel

FREDERICK V. COVILLE, Chairman Committee on Research

EXECUTIVE STAFF OF THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE

GILBERT GROSVENOR, EDITOR
JOHN OLIVER LA GORCE, Associate Editor
RALPH A. GRAVES
Assistant Editor

WILLIAM J. SHOWALTER
Assistant Editor

CHARLES J. BELL

FRANKLIN L. FISHER Chief of Illustrations Division

J. R. HILDEBRAND, Chief of School Service

President American Security and
Trust Company

JOHN JOY EDSON
Chairman of the Board, Wash-
ington Loan & Trust Company

DAVID FAIRCHILD

In charge of Agricultural Explorations, U. S. Department of Agriculture

C. HART MERRIAM

Member National Academy of
Sciences

O. P. AUSTIN

Statistician

GEORGE R. PUTNAM

Commissioner U. S. Bureau of
Lighthouses

GEORGE SHIRAS, 3D

Formerly Member U. S. Con-
Faunal Naturalist, and
gress,
Wild-game Photographer

E. LESTER JONES
Director U. S. Coast and Geo-
detic Survey

[blocks in formation]

ORGANIZED FOR "THE INCREASE AND

TO carry out the purposes for which it was
founded thirty-eight years ago, the National
Geographic Society publishes this Magazine. All re-
ceipts are invested in the Magazine itself or expended
directly to promote geographic knowledge.

ARTICLES and photographs are desired.
For material which the Magazine can use,

generous remuneration is made. Contributions Should
be accompanied by an addressed return envelope and
postage.

IMMEDIATELY after the terrific eruption of the world's largest crater, Mt. Katmai, in Alaska, a National Geographic Society expedition was sent to make observations of this remarkable phenomenon. Four expeditions have followed and the extraordinary scientific data resulting given to the world. In this vicinity an eighth wonder of the world was discovered and explored-"The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes," a vast area of steaming, spouting fissures. As a result of The Society's discoveries this area has been created a National Monument by proc. lamation of the President of the United States.

AT an expense of over $50,000 The Society sent a notable series of expeditions into Peru to investigate the traces of the Inca race. Their

DIFFUSION OF GEOGRAPHIC KNOWLEDGE" discoveries form a large share of our knowledge of a civilization waning when Pizarro first set foot in Peru. THE Society also had the honor of subscribing a substantial sum to the expedition of Admiral. Peary, who discovered the North Pole. NOT long ago The Society granted $25.000, and in addition $75,000 was given by individual members to the Government when the congressional appropriation for the purpose was insufficient, and the finest of the giant sequoia trees of California were thereby saved for the American people.

THE Society is conducting extensive explorations and excavations in northwestern New Mexico, which was one of the most densely populated areas in North America before Columbus came, region where prehistoric peoples lived in vast communal dwellings and whose customs, ceremonies, and name have been engulfed in an oblivion.

a

THE Society also is maintaining expeditions in the unknown area adjacent to the San Juan River in southeastern Utah, and in Yunnan, Kweichow, and Kansu, China--all regions virgin to scientific study.

« PreviousContinue »