Page images
PDF
EPUB

It is thought by some that the seed might be gathered in the fall, sown on land that had been kept free from weeds, and by these means meadows of the natural grass of the country might be formed.

Timothy grass begins to be cultivated with success. For the first three or four years of my residence in this country, it was doubtful whether clover, timothy or any other cultivated grasses could be made profitable for meadows in this rich soil and dry climate. I observed that, in attempts to make meadows, the weeds soon overrun the grass. But this notion was entirely incorrect. To produce timothy with success, the ground must be well cultivated in the summer, either by an early crop or by fallowing, and the seed sown about the 20th of September at the rate of ten or twelve quarts of clean seed to the acre, and lightly brushed in. If the season is in any way favorable, it will get a rapid start before winter. By the last week in June, it will produce from a ton and a half to two tons per acre of the finest of hay. It then requires an annual dressing of stable manure, and occasionally the turf may be scratched with a harrow, to prevent the roots from binding too hard. By this process timothy meadows may be made and preserved. There are meadows in St. Clair county which have yielded heavy crops of hay in succession for seven years, and bid fair to continue for an indefinite period.

Cattle, and especially horses, should never be permitted to run in meadows in Illinois. The fall grass may be cropped down by calves and colts. There is but little more labor required to produce a crop of timothy than a crop of oats and as there is not a stone or a pebble to interrupt, the soil may be turned up every third or fourth year for corn, and afterwards laid down to grass again.

A species of blue grass is cultivated by some farmers for pastures. If well set and not eaten down in summer, blue grass pastures may be kept fresh and green till late in autumn or even in the winter. The English spire grass has been cultirated with success in the Wabash country.

Of the trefoil or clover, there is but little cultivated. A prejudice exists against it, as it is imagined to injure horses by affecting the glands of the mouth and causing them to slaver. It grows luxuriantly, and may be cut for hay early in June. The white clover comes in naturally where the ground has been cultivated and thrown by, or along the sides of old roads and paths.

The following outline of Gallatin saline and works has been politely furnished by Gen. Leonard White, clerk of the county:

There are nine furnaces containing on an average, sixty kettles each, holding from thirty-six to sixty gallons, and which make upwards of three thousand bushels per week, averaging about 130,000 bushels per annum, after deducting lost time. The works are carried on by Messrs. B. White, J. Davis, John Crenshaw, W. Weed and C. Guard. Salt sells at the works from thirty-seven and a half to fifty cents per bushel. A bushel of salt is fifty pounds. About one-half of the salt manufactured here is exchanged for corn, corn meal, flour, beef, pork, potatoes, onions and every article that can be raised in the country. The usual rates of exchange are two bushels of corn for one of salt, one and a half bushels of corn meal for one of salt. Four bushels of salt are given for one hundred pounds of beef, six bushels for one hundred pounds of pork, four bushels for one hundred pounds of flour, and the same in proportion for other articles of produce. Thus the farmers are supplied with salt at a cheap rate, and find a market for all their products at home.

As to the salt works at this place (Brownsville), there is one furnace with fifty. five kettles, that boil thirty-five gallons each, and which make one hundred bushels of salt per week. In the present situation of the works, it takes three hundred gallons of water to make one busbel of salt. This is owing to the well being tubed, and the fresh water not being excluded, which will be effected during the present year. The well is two hundred and three feet deep, and the fountain is so strong that it gushes six feet above the surface of the ground, and in quantity sufficient to run five furnaces. Salt water can be had in many places in this county, and it is my opinion that much better water can be had by boring deeper, than in any other part of the State.

Mr. William H. Nielson has commenced boring for salt water one mile below Brownsville, on the banks of the Big Muddy river, and has gotten down one hundred and thirty-seven feet, at which distance he has plenty of water, fully as strong as mine. He intends boring three hundred feet deep, unless he gets water sufficiently strong at a less distance. He will erect this summer two furnaces of the following description : Two pans of twenty feet in length and five feet in width, which will hold about twelve hundred gallons of water, and thirty kettles in each furnace of sixty gallons, all of which, together with copper tubes for the well, and sundry other articles necessary for the furnaces have arrived at the place. The salt made here is superior to that made at the Ohio saline, near Shawneetown, and I have no doubt there will be large quantities made in a few years.

Mr. Nielson has opened & very extensive coal bank about four miles above Brownsville. The mine is inex haustible, as far as the experiment has been tried, and the coal equal to that at Pittsburg in quality.

He is preparing to send off ten boats loaded with coal this season, and contemplates sending sixty boats next season. Mr. Nielson's coal bank is immediately in the banks of the Big Muddy river, and is so convenient that the coal can be thrown from the bank into the boats. There are a number of beds of coal in this county, and equally good.

Castor oil.-Considerable quantities of this article are manufactured in Illinois. There is one castor oil press in Edwards county, three in Randolph county, and two at Edwardsville, in Madison county.

The manufacture of this article at Edwardsville was commenced by Mr. John Adams, in 1828 ; in which season he made five hundred gallons, which sold at the rate of $2 50 per gallon. In 1826, he made eight hundred gallons, at the price of . $1 60; in 1827, one thousand gallons, at $1 25; in 1828, eighteen hundred gallons, which sold for $1 00; in 1829, he made five hundred and twenty-eight gallons, at the price of $1 12+; in 1830, two presses were started and made ten thousand gallons, from 76 to 87 cents per gallon. The present season he will make about twelve thousand five hundred gallons, and the wholesale price is about seventy-five cents.

One bushel of the castor bean or palma christi will yield about seven quarts and a half pint of oil.

The beans are cleaned and well dried or heated in a furnace, put in a cylinder, and the screw, which is an immense one of wood, forces down a follower with great power. The screw is turned by a horse and a large lever, precisely similar to that of a cider mill, in New England called a nut mill.

Beans are purchased from the farmers for seventy-five cents per bushel.

INDEX.

92

..... 142

.62, 126

.. 140

A

PAGE.
PAGE. College bnildings, improvements of. 132
Accounts against University, how to be Collegiate years and terms
made out.

.87, 200
100
Commercial Department..

195
Admission, terms of..

.91, 92, 187 Committees:
Advanced standing, candidates for

Auditing.... ..29, 35, 46, 79, 98, 127, 131
Agricultural:

Executive 39, 44, 48,60,73,78,101,131, 135, 148
Circular..

216

appropriations of, 136, 138, 141,
Course

.87, 189
Department

(142, 143, 145, 147
.60, 97, 189

sub-com.of, ou Busey Farm 147
committee on, 46, 68, 94, 96, 205

on Cabinet Cases

145
Implements
..96, 97, 109, 202

on Commutation.

137
Lectures

.99, 196
on Conference

137
Agriculture, etc., in early times.

293
on Gradlug

135
Illinois

210

on Insurance
Professor of

on Lumber

137
Allouez, on Illinois country

293
on Plans.

135, 143
Apparatus.

60, 196

on Purchase of Lots 138, 140, 143,
Apples.
253 Committee, Executive, action on:

[146
Appropriations to:

Farm rents.

148
Agricultural Department.
97 Griggs' Farm.

143
Cabinet

.93, 103

Organization...........
Fences

.135, 136
98 Printing.

145
Miscellaneous

102, 115, 130, 132 Purchase of lots
Purchase of lots.

. 136, 139, 140

99 Regent authorized to issue circulars
Attorney to examine titles.
.28, 32, 132

make improve-
ments..

188
B
Resolutions M. L. Dunlap...

..143, 146
Right of way to road.

147
Barley

.242, 318

railway

147
Barng..
287 Saturday Courier.

146
Beans.

255
Scrip, expenses of sale.

133
Bees

285
Bale ordered

197
Beets..
252 Sidewalks...

139
Blackberry.
271 Street extension

142
Blanks, etc., ordered.
17 Supervisor's report.

199
Boarding

.59, 93, 200
Survey

187
Book-Keeper.
130 Treasurer's accounts

142
Bonds, Champaign county ...8, 38, 45, 95 Committee on :
Botanical collection

107 Agricultural Department, 46, 68, 74, 79, 94,
Broom-corn

.256, 306
Buckwheat..

(112, 181
242 Buildings and Grounds, 33, 37, 39, 79, 87, 97,
Basey Farm, possession of .

101
Business, order of..

(126, 131
. 20, 76
Business

..18, 20
By-Laws..

.21, 76

By-Laws. .21, 39, 40, 46, 69, 76, 80, 131

Course of Study and Faculty, 20, 23, 40, 43,
с

( 46, 47, 79, 87, 126, 127, 131

Finance, 21, 33, 34, 35, 46, 66,74,79,94,128, 131
Cabinet, purchase of.

.98, 102
a committee on titles

27
Calendar.

.87, 200

addition to ...
Capital required for farming

..37, 46
292 Horticultural Department, 46, 69, 72, 79,
Carrots..

252
Castor bean

[101, 122, 131
.818, 320

Library and Cabinet, 46, 69, 72, 75, 79, 122,
Cattle
.281, 294, 295, 298, 302

(125, 131
Charlevoix, description of Illinois. 294 Mechanical Department 46, 69, 79, 131
Chemistry and Natural Science, department

Military Department ........ 46, 69, 81, 131
.60.52
Nominations

124, 131
Chemistry, Professor of.
206 Prof. Powell's letter

.82, 38
Cherries
258 Purchasing lands.

.42, 70, 73
Chiccory..

256

Regency
Circular on examination of Students

. 20, 31
100
Regent's Salary..

..18, 19, 20
and Catalogue
183 Salaries

122, 197
Clock, purchase of authorized
196 Seal.

29, 40, 41
Clovers

.234, 304

Standing
County Education

..46, 78, 131, 205
45 Committee to receive trees..

111
College buildings

185 Corn....... 212, 293, 295, 297, 301, 305, 316, 317

of .

.87, 67

Flax....

PAGE.

PA
Cotton..
..265, 295, 299, 306, 318 Laws ordered printed

17
Crops, exhaustion by.

926

Lectureships....
rotation of

.62, 127, 196
224 Legumes...

955
Currants..
971 Library.

184, 209
List of Trustees
D

11, 13, 204
Live stock.

981

Location of lands
Dalrying.

281
of University.

35
Debate,

rules of
Dormitories,

200

M
Drills.

242
DuPratz, description of Illinois.

295 Manual Labor System....... .59, 99, 19T
Manures..

296
Marquette, on Illinois country

293
Meadows.

234
Election of Officers...

21 Mechanical Department.
of Professors..

.. 46, 69, 79, 114, 131
..97, 126, 127 Mechanic, employed.

109
of Regent...
18 Mechanics, Professor of.

69
Expenditures.
67 | Meeting, March 12, 1867.

12
May 7, 1867

31
Nvember 26, 1867.

66
March 10, 1868.

103
Faculty.
..61, 62, 206 Meetings, Biennial .

29
Farm and Garden.

114
By-Laws, concerning.

76
Farmer, Head.

96
Executive Committee..

135
Farms repurted.
218 Membre, on Illinois country.

293
acreage.

224 Military Department, 46, 50, 51, 69, 81, 114, 131
Fees of students.

. 92, 93, 201
Mowers.

234
F-DC 8...

283, 313
Mules. ..

281
Finances

..66, 106, 114, 117, 129
.255, 305, 318

N
Fruits, artificial.

104
orchard.
258 Natural Sciences....

.52, 62, 91, 188
Natural growths of State. .220, 307, 312, 314
G
Non-attendance.

111
General Educational Course

91
General Science and Literature, Depart-

O
ment uf..

..60, 52, 188

Oats..
Gooseberries..

.242, 305
271 | Office, terms of..

26, 77
Grains
242 Officers and Instructors.

206
plowing for..

242
etc., of Board

77
Grapes..

.271, 302, 295, 294
Salaries of

41
Grasses...

.234, 303, 318

Onions
Griggs Farm

256, 307
102, 133
O chard fruits.

258
Ground plants

250 Opening of University

Optional aud Select Courses.
H

P
Harrows..

242
Head Farmer.

.69, 96
Pastures

234
Hedges..
288 Pe ches..

258
Hemp.

255, 295
Pears...

258
.25, 307, 295 Peas..

255
Horses
. 281, 298, 301, 302 Pitman, description of Illinois

295
Horticulture, Departmont of.

..80, 51
Planters..

249
Professor of..
62 Plowing, deep... .........

226
Houses...
287 Plows.

226
Polytechnic branch at Chicago. ..22, 27
I

Departmeut.

.50, 51
Inaugural:

Potatoes......

.242, 297, 301, 318
Exercises.
.103, 111, 120, 149 Poultry.

.285, 294, 295, 303
Address of Dr. Bateman.
155 Powell, Professor, letter from.

39
of Dr. Gregory

174
report of.

120
Letters of Cullom, s. M.
153 Prayer, prescribed.

16
of Lawrence, C. B.

102

Preparatory classes.
of Logan, J. A

153 Proceedings Board of Trustees .12, 134
of Marshall, S. S.

154 Professors, election of ......92, 97, 126, 127, 128
of Uglesby, R. J.

150
qualifications.

61
of Raum, G. B.

184
Professorships.

69
of Stevens, B. N

152
Publisbing.

134
0 Yates, R...
151 Pumpkins...

.255, 306
Speeches of Hurlbut, S. A.

173
of Moulton, S. W

149

Q
Insurance of University building.

101

Qualifications of Studunts. ....7, 56, 91, 99, 187
L

R
Labor, manual.
.59, 99, 197 Railroad, right of way for...

.100, 147
Laws, concerning Industrial University . 85 | Raspberries...

871

ps...

92, 188

[ocr errors]

16

....... 287

[ocr errors]

Reapers...

249 Squashes
Record, mode of making op..

255, 307
102 Standing Committees ........
ordered..

.46, 78, 131, 205
16 Strawberries .

871
Regent, election of..

.16, 16, 17, 18 Students, admission of............. ..91, 92, 18T
approved
189 Students, catalogue of..

207
duties of.

..8, 77
residence, by counties,

208
nominations for..

16 Studies, Agricultural and Horticultural, 87, 189
paid monthly.

41 Studies, optional and select
Regent, report on.

........55, 91
31

University course.... ..54, 91, 188
reports of..

.112, 121, 122 Superintendent of buildings and grounds, 99,
salary of.
18

(100, 141
took his seat.
82 Swine

.281, 303
Reporters

110
Reports..

111

T
Rooms, students.

.69, 200
Root crops.
202 Textile plants...

255
Roral Architecture.

Timber plantations

276
Rye...

242 Tobacco

258 295, 318
Trade and Commerce, Department of, 60,52,196
S

Treasurer:
Bond of.....

23, 39
Safe, resolutions..

23 Election of..

.23, 24, 25
Salaries, 18, 28, 29, 31, 41, 78, 96, 97, 122, 126,127 Nominations for.

22
Salary of head farmer.

96
Reports of...

........71, 106
Professors..

..97, 126

Salary of..
Regent...

..28, 27
18, 81
Tenure of office.

6
Secretary, Corresponding. .29, 127 Trustees :
Recording.. 29, 127 Expenses of ....

.29, 35, 45, 98
Treasurer.

.28, 127
List of..

.11, 204
Scholarships and examinations...
121 Officers and committees of.

205
honorary.
.58, 115, !99 Organization.

19
prize....
102, 199 Proceedings of..

12, 134
School house, grant of site for.. 106, 133 Terms of office fixed by lot...

19
Scrip, investment of funds arising from sale Tuition, charges for ...

.58, 92, 93, 94
of

45
free to indigent students.

133
Scrip, location of
.37, 67, 95, 115 Turnips.

.252, 306
sale of. ....37, 43, 67, 71, 95, 103, 115, 129
Seal of the University .29, 40, 41, 42, 125

U
Secretary, Corresponding:
Duties of...
.6, 78 Uniform...

.84, 86, 198
Election of

25 University:
Reports of..
..44, 45, 109 Aims of the..

..47, 185
Salary of.

..29, 127 Departments and courses of, 50, 54, 186, 188
Term of office.

.20, 77
Expenses at...

201
Secretary, Recording:

Government of

201
Authorized to publish proceedings.... 99 Literary Societies of..

202
Duties of.

Location of....

38
Election of.

.26, 131
Officers, etc., of.......

206
Pro tem..

.13, 30
Opening of....

44
Resolution instructing

107 Students of Spring term 1898.
Salary of...
.29, 127 Vasey, Dr. George, proposition of.

107
Term of office.

.26, 77
Sexton of Congregational church, Cham-

W
paign, payment of.

45
Sheep..
.218, 303 Warrants, list of..

117
Sman fruits.
271 Waicr-melons..

205
Soils and Subsoils
.220, 809, 311 Wheat...

.242, 294, 295, 297
Sorghum..

258 Woodlands.

...276, 300, 304, 816

[graphic]
« PreviousContinue »