Page images
PDF
EPUB

ILLINOIS INDUSTRIAL UNIVERSITY.

THE ILLINOIS INDUSTRIAL UNIVERSITY is located between the contiguous cities of Urbana and Champaign, Champaign County, Illinois, 128 miles from Chicago, on the Chicago branch of the Illinois Central Railroad.

It was first opened for the reception of students on Monday, the 2d day of March, 1868.

The Industrial University was founded by an act of the Legislature, approved February 28, 1867, and endowed by the Congressional grant of four hundred and eighty thousand acres of land scrip, under the law providing for Agricultural Colleges. It was further enriched by the donation of Champaign county, of farms, buildings, and bonds, valued at $100,000.

The main University building is of brick, one hundred and twenty-five feet in length, and five stories in height. Its public rooms are sufficient for the accommodation of over four hundred students, and it has private study and sieeping rooms for one hundred and thirty. The cities of Champaign and Urbana, which are connected by a street railroad running past the University grounds, are well supplied with churches and schools, and will afford abundant facilities for boarding and rooming a large body of students.

The University domain, including ornamental and parade grounds, experimental and model farms, gardens, etc., comprises over one thousand acres of land.

AIMS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

The chief aim of the Industrial University, as expressed in the law of Congress, is “TAE LIBERAL AND PRACTICAL EDUCATION OF THE INDUSTRIAL CLASSES in the several pursuits and professions in life.” In order to this, it is required, under the Statute of Incor

poration, “ to teach, in the most thorough manner, such branches of learning as are related to Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and Military Tactics, without excluding other scientific and classical studies.The hope of the Trustees and Faculty is that the Institution will produce scholars of sound learning, but also of practical sense and skill-men abreast with their times—men of christian culture, trained to affairs, and able and willing to lend a helping hand in all the great practical enterprises of this most practical age; and to be leaders, if need be, in those mighty industrial interests on which the social well-being and civilization of our country so much depend It is also their aim and hope that the University shall contribute to the increase and diffusion of real science, and especially of that science which bears upon and promotes the useful arts.

STUDIES, AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION.

Instruction will be provided in the following branches of knowledge and arts: In the English, French, German, Latin and Greek languages and literatures; in the several branches of Mathematical science, pure and applied, except common Arithmetic; in the physical sciences, Chemistry, Natural Philosophy, Botany, Zoology, Entomology, Physiology-animal and vegetable, Comparative Anatomy, Mineralogy, Meteorology, Geology, Astronomy, Historyancient and modern, Political Economy, Civil Polity, Rural Economy and Law, Rhetoric, Philology, Logic, Mental Science, Ethics, History of Science and Philosophy; also in Penmanship, Drawing, Composition, Elocution, and Vocal Music; in Agriculture, Horticulture, Fruit Growing, Landscape Gardening, Architecture, Military Tactics, Civil and Military Engineering, Mechanics, Mining and Metallurgy, Analytical Chemistry, and in some of the Mechanic Arts.

In order to systematize the instruction, and to guide students in their course, the following schools or departments of instruction are organized, or will be as soon as required :

I. The Department of Science, Literature, and Arts.
II.

Agriculture.

Mechanical Science and Art.
IV.

Military Tactics and Engineering.
Mining and Metallurgy.
Civil Engineering.

III.

V.
VI.

VII. The Department of Analytical and Applied Chemistry.
VIII.

Natural History, Practical Geology, etc.
IX.

Commercial Science and Art. Students, regularly admitted, will be allowed to take such studies as they may choose, provided they are prepared to pursue the same successfully with the regular classes; and, provided that each student, unless specially excused, shall have at least fifteen regular lessons or lectures per week.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.

1st. Each student is required by law to be at least fifteen years of age, but it is believed that few will be found mature enough at this age to enter with the highest profit upon the studies of the University, and it is recommended, as a general rule, that students be at least eighteen years old before entering.

2d. The law also prescribes that “no student shall be admitted to instruction in any of the departments of the University who shall not previously undergo a satisfactory examination in each of the branches ordinarily tanght in the common schools of the State.” In addition to these, candidates for any particular department will be examined in such studies as may be necessary to fit them to pursue successfully the course in that department.

For admission to the regular course in Science, Literature, and Arts, the student should be prepared to sustain an examination in Natural Philosophy, Physiology, Algebra, (Davies' Bourdon or equivalent), Geometry (Davies' Legendre or equivalent), Latin Grammar, Cæsar, Cicero's Orations, Virgil's Georgics, and Æneid.

These additional studies, though not positively required for admission to the other departments, are strongly recommended.

The chief aim of all examinations for admission to the University is to ascertain the student's preparation to pursue successfully the studies of the course. Hence, thoroughness, and a general knowledge of the subject, will be accounted as of more importance than the amount studied. A student of earnest purpose and well disciplined mind will often pursue a new study more successfully than one of much more extensive preparation, but of less discipline and diligence. We are much more solicitous about the pro gress of the student after he enters, than about the preparation made before he enters, the University. Frequent and searching examinations will be held to test the progress made, and to deter

mine each student's fitness to remain in the classes. The University cannot be held responsible for the lack of thoroughness in the common school studies of its students.

PREPARATORY CLASSES.

It is incompatible with the more appropriate and important work of the University to maintain a preparatory department; but to meet the exigencies of students not fully prepared, the Faculty will organize and instruct, during this first college year, classes in the preparatory studies, except the common school branches. When the higher classes shall be filled it will be impracticable to continue this preparatory work.

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND ARTS.

The studies in this department embrace those scientific and literary branches required for a liberal education, and which are important for the most successful study of the various industrial courses. The studies of the course have been arranged to come within fonr years, as follows:

FIRST, OR FRESHMAN YEAR.
REGULAR STUDIES.

OPTIONAL AND EXTRA. 1st TERM — Trigonometry and Surveying.

Structural Botany.
Cicero de Senectute.
French.

Greek. 2D TERM— Analytical Geometry,

Systematic Botany.
Odes of Horace. French.

Greek.
3D TERM-Systematic Botany.
Descriptive Geometry and

Greek,
Geometrical Drawing.
Satires of Horace, French Literature.

SECOND, OR SOPHOMORE YEAR.
1ST TERM—Calculus.
Chemistry. Zoology.

Tacitus-Annals.
German.

Greek.
20 TERM_Chemistry.
Entomology, etc.

Tacitus.
Physics--Mechanics.

Greek.
German,
3D TERM-Mineralogy.
Physics-Rhetoric,

Chemistry.
German Literature.

Cicero de Oratore.

REGULAR STUDIES.

[ocr errors]

THIRD, OR JUNIOR YEAR,

OPTIONAL AND EXTRA.
1st Tery-Astronomy.
Geology.

Ancient History.
English Literature.
2d TERM—Geology.
Modern History.

Astronomy.
Meteorology.

English Literature.
SD TERY_Logic.
Physical Geography.

English Literature.
Modern History.

Butler's Analogy.

FOURTH, OR SENIOR YEAR.
1st TERM-Mental Philosophy,
Political Economy.

Science of Education,
Elements of Criticism.
2d TERM-Moral Philosophy.
History of Civilization.

Social Science.
Civil Polity. Constitution of U. S. Evidences of Christianity.
3D TERM—History of Philosophy.

Modern Philology.
Constitutional Law.
History of Inductive Sciences.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

The studies in this department will be arranged ultimately in two courses :

1. The course in General Agriculture.

2. The course in Horticulture, Fruit Growing, and Landscape Gardening.

The aim of these courses will be to fit Students to manage successfully, for themselves or others, agricultural and horticultural estates and enterprises. The studies will be pursued partly by lectures, accompanied by courses of reading and examinations, and partly by the regular study of text books. Practical exercises and experiments on the farm, and in the gardens, nurseries, and fruit plantations, will constitute a part of the course.

The following conspectus of Agricnltural and Horticultural science and art, exhibits a general view of the field designed to be covered by the instruction in these two courses :

« PreviousContinue »