Page images
PDF
EPUB

ESKIMOS IN SIBERIA, FROM CAPE BEHRING TO EAST CAPE-Continued.

ESKIMO-ENGLISH VOCABULARY continued.

Clio klo'wok Choro'nok Chow wik Do'clet Doo'loo E het E la lu ke ta Ela'yet Eli Eren Etaminok E'te get Etel ko E'yo E'yuto Goak'ta Ha nepa Ho tang'a Huo'to Hun Ilun yun Il'wah Il wil loo Impnet Im'uk Im'islio Ippo ha'ha wa Ir ago I'wok Ka go'ay ok Kali vin'ok Kali wag'a nin Kaing'a Ka kale'ma Kal loo'yok Kang'kök Kang kolo Kanka Kanka ro Ka now'tin Kap'se Kaj een'a Kaj se'nok Kasha hok Ka va nok'too ma Karvok Ka wag'puk Kehik Kennek Konoak'a Ketiga Ken'ye Kig meen'rook Kig'mok Killa'luk Kilu goo'too Kin'a ga King'ik King'oo Hing'yuk Kit swed Ki'n Kle'puk ko a ko'a Kol loo'ra Kob ro's Koh'u ma Kolip'se kan Kolloin Kol su'gwam Kom'in tok Kom'me a Kom'me ko Kong'wok Kon'ik Koo ka'no Koom'luk koomuk Koo'tit Koo we'a Korong'a Kotile ry yoke Kut'lea

Sack Deer horns Knife Curlew White fox Hand; gloro Star Sablo Marmot Coat File Feet Fourth finger Eve Nowy Stoop White owl Cold Badger You Yours Red fox Reindeer Clift Water Cord Pantaloons Les Walrus Aurora Red fox Biril Black bear AX Lance Crab Crab Moutli Dance Pantaloons Wolverino How much Calm licart Dream Sleep Eagle Pantaleons Mountain sheep Face Oil skin Badger Pot Dog Clondy Sink Ser:Ipin Diver Jelly-fish Shrimp Human hair Hatchet Thread Sit down Herring Puitin Tern Fancy bcots Woman Turbot Whalo flukes Sleil Sled Widgeon Snowing lot Thumb Louse Teeth Cotton Deer White inan White fox

Kot pok'u Kowo a rok Ko veruko Kuh'ya Kun at oo'rok Kug'ara Kun laga Kun uk Kwallu Kwil wit Kwuto Kyak La leet La lug'a ra La lute walen Long ko ho'it Loo'luk Lukluk Lukluk'p::k Mi kolu Mam'lek Mamma Vanak Ma räning'ta Memlek Mes kwok Me temel kook Mukluk Moo ha Muk gil'ge Mum ma la Muri goon'a Mungt o'ha Mun ramok Muntuk Mut tuk look Nagro Nal'huh Nak'set Nalue tat Nan'let Na o'! Nan ook Na'pesk Na poalı'yak Na sho'kwok Nat'chok Na to'cliet Nat'suk Negia Ne gan'ne Ne kreshe ok Nemam kin Ne ot'ka

Door Breeze Water boots Lip Near Shrimp Wolf Sand Eider duck, Raven Fight Covered canoo Mitters Sing White man Fingerring Overshirt Brant Goose Shutdoor Seal Breasts Erg Fly Seal Animal hair Naked Big, open water Pot Boy Breasts Walrus skin 110ls Go to bed Whale meat Raven Mother Snell Matches llare Land otter White bear Whito boar Lako Mast Crazy Seal Curlew Seal Lat Whale killer Drink of water Big Crab Drawers Know Badger Plenty Ilungry Rain Mountain Hill River Sister Human hair IIuman hair Woman Barger Go to led Stand Button Under ground houso New Woman Bowhead whalo Big duck Crazy Sit down Crow-bill duck Hermaphrodite Big Whale spear Hare

Nepa

Ne she'mok Ne toong'ook Nim ka'keen Nin gim'e ta Nip'clok Nijek Ni ret Wivuk Ni'yig Noo'ya Noo'yok Now'skat Nue'to Nug a luk po Nuk koo yuk Vuk to'wha Nung'lub Nu tow'ok Ok an'ok Ok'aw ak Ok mine'ok Oknek'to Ok'o noke Ok pah On al'shuk 011garo Oo'an ok Oo kaw'che

1275

ESKIMOS IN SIBERIA, FROM CAPE BEIRING TO EAST CAPE--Continued.

ESKIMO-ENGLISH VOCABULARY-continued.

Oo ke'mek luk Oo klung'a Oo koo'a Ook took Ook wad lu'pe Ook wa'yek Oo lah On loo'k wo Oo mung'lum Oopka Oolu look'in (ou're Oo winga Orak (ro-go'ro Owo tok'o (sk ( yok wot'cka Pa h kin ok Parecht Pe lek'it Pe lo'kin Po ni'a Pe rak ot'ku Pil wint in Poo goodt Puojak Poo jook'tat Poo'noon Puo'yok Pum chu'wuk Pum'yo Punga Rok'la Room'ka Saug sek'a hoy ik Seekeek Seet look Seguh Se'koon Se'ku Se'kuh Se u'suk Sha liga not Shi kin'ya Sho'ko Sho'kok Sho kwa Shu kiloog'tin Shu k wil nut Shung ow'ro Shuns sho Shu pa Sing noh'a luk Suuh'ok So ko'ra Sooʻnek Sow woo'yuk Stoke Suk ala'yuko Suk'a luk Tah'owok Tak nil'er go Tallet Tal no'whoh Ta pallet

Holo
Whalebono
Wolf
Fire
Salmon
Ilare
Touguo
Oll
Wo
Moose
Intercourse
Anchor
Husband
Lamp
Sled
GO
Blood
Intercourse
Brown bear
Whale line
Boots
Small
Pullin
What do you want
Iron
Shorel
Narwal
Scissors
Clam
Smoke
Vise
Stocking
Mino
Flv
White bear
Duck
Marmot
Mattock
Ear
Needle
Ico
Needle
Box
What do you wish
Sun
Winter
Whalebone
Crane
Very quick
Quick
Bead
Whale killer
You
Kiss
Boy
whale gum
Coinb
Drum
Finger nail
Bad man
Bad
White for
Black
Ptarmigan
Baby
Lynx

Tap'che
Tap'kwok
Tap pertok
Tas luk
To chim'na
Ted li pat'ka
Ten keh
To palet
Te pofhok
Tig'eh
Tig u'ok
Til he gerina
Ting a lan ukok
Tis ke ville
To a waik
To'brok
Tok'a lo
Toka uko
Tok look
To ko'a
To'kok
To'nok
Too'in a
Too kal'a
Too kwa
Toolik
Toom'ta
Too'muh
Toon goo'u
Toon'too
Tou plitko
Too to kwok
Too'wang
Too' Wuk
To ret kok
To ret kot ka
Tow il'er y uke
Tu'ga
Tug'a
Tung wo'hok
Tug yo'a
Tus luk'tuk
U'a yeh
Ukshuk se ruk
U lik'a
Unga oo'shiok
Ung to'hok
Ung Và ok puk
Ung yet
U più uk'tuk
Up kut'e tet
Uwy'u wa
Welle
Whing'yo
Wil um'ok
Wing'a
Winga wing
Wool wuk yuk
Wot le'a
Ya bo'kwa
Yapis'ka
Yole
Yok'tuh
Yo'o po
Yup pa

Delt
Cable
Screw
Arm
Grindstone
Shut door
Moon
Vountain sheep
Fin-back whale
Forcfinger; thimble
Hit
A saw
Sail
Starfish
Wrestle
Eider duck
Small owl
Sick
llawk
Nail
Drad
Devil
Salmon
Walrus tuak
Seal spear
Golden plorer
Deer
Eiler duck
Coutish
Deer
Finished
Button
Walrus tusk
Gun
Jelly-fishi
Jellisis
Negro
White fox
Crane
Hump-back whale
Bracelet
Deat
Gull
Shrimp
Wife
Paint
Gray whale
Sl:ip
Boat
Good
Bail; missile
Loon
Eagle
Certainly
Stone tool

No
Will not
Snowshoo
Knife
Our
Cartridge
Min
Fathom
Brother
Summer

CHAPTER XXVII.

EDUCATIONAL MATTERS OF INTEREST IN VARIOUS

STATES.

ARIZONA.

Report for 1895–96, Hon. T. E. Dalton, superintendent of public instruction. The census of children has increased since the year 1895 to 16,936, being 1,027 more than in that year. Of this number 76 per cent attended the public schools some time during the year. The attendance at private schools added would raise to 82 per cent. The average of actual daily attendance, however, was only 45 per cent, a fact which, in the opinion of the superintendent, shows the need of an effective compulsory educational law.

The increase in the number of school districts during the year 1895 was 1, making the number now 223. Increase in number of teachers is 3, the whole number now being 224. Some reduction in wages has taken place. Duration of school term was 6.34 months, an increase of about one-third of a month. The number of new schoolhouses built in the biennium is 20. Table of receipts and expenditures is added.

At one of the meetings of the Territorial board of education (June 20, 1896), among the instructious given to teachers was the following interesting one regarıling corporal punishment:

"Any teacher, before inflicting corporal punishment upon a pupil, must first notify the parents or guardian and one member of the board of trustees of his or her intention at least one day before such punishment is to be inflicted, stating the day and hour at which the punishment will be inflicted, and extending an invitation to such parent or guardian and one trustee to be present. The punishment must not be inflicted in the presence of the school."

The report urgently recommends a uniform course of studies in the entire Territory.

The report comments upon the fact that, notwithstanding the severe responsibilities of the superintendent of public instruction, his position is dependent upon one appointing power, which subtracts from its dignity. He contends that, as in other States and Territories, he should have control over county superintendents, trustees, and teachers, and be allowed an adequate salary. The matter is argued at some leugth. So it is with the provision of the school law which makes the county probate judges ex officio county school superintendents, whether or not they have had experience in teaching. Recommendation is made of some provision of law whereby the standards in grading in county schools by county board examiners may be brought at least to some nearer approximation to conformity. The report, indeed, advances the opinion that these boards should be abolished and their duties assigned to the county superintendent.

The new law for apportionment of school funds, although liable to some objections, has proven to be in the main satisfactory. Some carelessness in the too rapid increase in the number of school districts is complained of, as well as the inefficiency of the existing compulsory school law which the attorney-general has decided to be inoperative and void.”

ARKANSAS.

Report for 1895-96, Superintendent Junius Jordan. While the value of property in general has dwindled, taxes for school purposes have been maintained. The work of the county normal schools has served to increase greatly competency among teachers and bring about a better system of grading. There has been a notable improvement in schoolhouses, apparatus, and other school appointments. Appeal is made for greater force in the superintendent's office, because of the increased number and burthen of its duties. Notwithstanding the urgent calls from every county in the State in that behalf, the superintendent

[ocr errors]

was enabled to visit only about ono-fourth. Change is earnestly asked in the matter of school directors, many of whom aro wholly incompetent, some using the office mainly for the purpose of putting in favorites, and many of whom neglect even the nominal work of making oflicial rules required by law at their hands. It is claimed that present conditions make change from the districts to the town system indispensable.

The report asks for abolition of the office of county oxaminers and creation of that of county superintendent, with liberal salary. If the former is to remain it is recommended that it be elective, in order to remove it from the intluence of politics, candidates being reqnired to stand examination before the State superintendent.

The country schools, although yet far behind what it is desirable they should become, have improved under the influence of the county normal schools. The report recommends advance in the programme of all common schools.

By an act of the general assembly of 1895 a normal school was required to be established for every county in the State, to continue in session for one month. This has been a notable success. Among many things said by the report upon this subject is the following:

“I feel authorized in saying that the money appropriated by the normal for the two years past has done more good for the public schools of Arkansas than all other movements of like nature that have been set on foot. Nor can we afford to stop where we are. The two years were osperimental years, but the results show such gratifying success that I feel it my duty to urge on the legislature a continuation of the appropriation for two years more. At the end of that time the State will be able and tho necessity apparent for the establishment of one or two permanent normals.”

The reports of county examiners, in the opinion of the superintendent, show more and more the inefficiency of the system of directors, The money received from the Peabody fund, which was $2,750 in 1893 and in 1894 $3,300, has been “utilized in normal work, supplementing the State appropriation in those counties when the attendance was so largo and important as to require one or more teachers and in extending, in some instances, the session of one month allowed by the State to five or six weeks, as the case demanded." Normal schools were held for three months in five towns-Jonesboro, Prescott, Hope, Normal, and Forest City, the last two of negro faculties.

The question of uniformity of text-books which prevails in some States is discussed at some length, the superintendent's views being adverse to it beyond the schools that are under the control of their own special boards of control. In view of the great differences in teachers as to culture, habits of thought, and methods of teaching, it would seem impracticable to attempt to carry it throughout the State.

On the whole, what has been done in the matter of education in the State since the beginning of the public system is to be highly commended an«l is auspicious of happy consequences. It requires inch time for a people, however unembarrassed by public, social, domestic, and individual constraints, to become familiar with a policy of great universal importance which has been newly introduced into their life. Such familiarity was necessarily prolonged during the throcs of political reconstruction after a disastrous war and the financial struggles, which ever since its passing bave been continuous. It is most notoworthy that the people have cheerfully submitted to the taxation necessary for the prosecution of a purpose whose value has year after year been more clearly recognized.

[ocr errors]

CALIFORNIA.

GREAT PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN THE UNITED STATES.

By EDWARD S. HOLDEN.'

The present decade has witnessed the foundation of several great libraries and the reorganization of others. The movement has not come too soon. Library organization in the United States has been studier with success, and wo have a school of librarians whose intelligence and fitness is beyond praise. By their congresses and by their printed papors the main principles, and more especially the details, of their work havo received a thorough examination. It might seem that there was little left to be said on matters of organization and policy. But a great library has to meet tho wants of a very varied constituency, and it may not be impertinent for one of tho outsiders and tax payers to present a few considerations, from the nontechnical point of view, which relate rather to principles than to details. I recollect a sight-scer at the Naval Observatory of Washington who asked to be furnished withi a volume which had cost the Government $8 to print. He was highly indignant when his request was denied. He was a tax payer, he said, and demanded

i Reprinted from Overland Monthly, August, 1897.

« PreviousContinue »