Letters, Reports, Etc., on the Subject of the Establishment of a School of Forestry

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - ... that the moneys so invested shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished (except so far as may be provided in section fifth of this act), and the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated by each State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college...
Page 8 - Any State which may take and claim the benefit of the provisions of this act shall provide, within five years, at least not less than one college, as described in the fourth section of this act, or the grant to such State shall cease; and said State shall be bound to pay the United States the amount received of any lands previously sold, and that the title to purchasers under the State shall be valid.
Page 8 - ... First, If any portion of the fund invested, as provided by the foregoing section, or any portion of the interest thereon shall, by any action or contingency, be diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it belongs, so that the capital of the fund shall remain forever undiminished ; and the annual interest shall be regularly applied without diminution to...
Page 8 - That all the expenses of management, superintendence, and taxes from date of selection of said lands, previous to their sales, and all expenses incurred in the management and disbursement of moneys which may be received therefrom, shall be paid by the States to which they may belong, out of the treasury of said States, so that the entire proceeds of the sale of said lands shall be applied, without any diminution whatever, to the purposes hereinafter mentioned.
Page 8 - No portion of said fund, nor the interest thereon, shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any building or buildings.
Page 7 - Second, that seventy-two sections of land shall be set apart and reserved for the use and support of a state university, to be selected by the governor of said state, subject to the approval of the commissioner of the general land office, and to be appropriated and applied in such manner as the legislature of said state may prescribe for the purpose aforesaid, but for no other purpose.
Page 8 - An annual report shall be made regarding the progress of each college, recording any improvements and experiments made, with their cost and results and such other matters, including State industrial and economical statistics, as may be supposed useful, one copy of which shall be transmitted by mail free, by each, to all the other colleges which may be endowed under the provisions of this act, and also one copy to the Secretary of the Interior.
Page 3 - It is an anomalous fact that the government is giving away the rich alluvial soil of Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Minnesota to any citizen who will plant a few acres of cottonwood or other inferior timber, while under the provisions of the pre-emption and homestead laws it is granting a license to destroy millions of acres of pine forests of almost incalculable value, which should be preserved as a nation's heritage.
Page 8 - ... management, superintendence, and taxes from date of selection of said lands, previous to their sales, and all expenses incurred in the management and disbursement of the moneys which may be received therefrom, shall be paid by the states to which they may belong out of the treasury of said states, so that the entire proceeds of the sale of said lauds shall be applied without any diminution whatever to the purposes hereinafter mentioned.
Page 7 - Year after year the question of rights of way across the public lands and reservations has been called to the attention of the Congress in the reports of the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of the General Land Office. The laws on this subject are numerous and apparently often incongruous.

Bibliographic information