Annual reports of the Department of Agriculture. 1895

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1895
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - Agriculture, the general design and duties of which shall be to acquire and to diffuse among the people of the United States useful information on subjects connected with agriculture, in the most general and comprehensive sense of that word and to procure, propagate, and distribute among the people new and valuable seeds and plants.
Page 31 - As every freeman, to preserve his independence (if without a sufficient estate), ought to have some profession, calling, trade or farm, whereby he may honestly subsist, there can be no necessity for nor use in establishing offices of profit, the usual effects of which are dependence and servility, unbecoming freemen...
Page 26 - Purchase and distribution of seeds, plants, etc. [Act of July 23, 1866, 14 Stat. L., 199, 201] SEC. 527. The purchase and distribution of seeds by the Department of Agriculture shall be confined to such seeds as are rare and uncommon to the country, or such as can be made more profitable by frequent changes from one part of our country to another...
Page 5 - The Secretary of Agriculture shall prescribe the form of annual financial statement required by section 3 of said act of March 2, 1887; shall ascertain whether the expenditures under the appropriation hereby made are in accordance with the provisions of said act, and shall make report thereon to Congress.
Page 31 - And if any officer shall wittingly and wilfully take greater fees than the law allows him, it shall ever after disqualify him from holding any office in this state, until he shall be restored by act of legislation.
Page 26 - ... country to another; and the purchase or propagation and distribution of trees, plants, shrubs, vines, and cuttings, shall be confined to such as are adapted to general cultivation and to promote the general interests of horticulture and agriculture throughout the United States.
Page 31 - As every freeman, to preserve his independence, (if he has not a sufficient estate,) ought to have some profession, calling, trade, or farm, whereby he may honestly subsist, there can be no necessity for, nor use in establishing offices of profit ; the usual effects of which are dependence and servility, unbecoming freemen, in the possessors and expectants ; faction, contention, corruption, and disorder among the people.
Page 33 - ... and unsatisfactory to those who intelligently follow it? How can the 42 per cent of the population of the United States which feeds the other 58 per cent and then furnishes more than 69 per cent of all the exports of the whole people, be making less profits in their vocation than those whom they feed when the latter supply less than 31 per cent of the exports of the country?
Page 30 - ... three persons holding office by appointment of the President and of some 500 laborers and workmen (not skilled) and charwomen, were included in the regularly classified civil service. Of the 500, only 78 laborers are in Washington. Of employees included in the classified service only four are excepted from the rule requiring appointment by competitive examination or by promotion. That order, therefore, put all the educated and skilled force of specialists and scientists, including all the chiefs...

Bibliographic information