The Britannic Question: A Survey of Alternatives

Front Cover
Longmans, Green and Company, 1913 - Constitutional history - 262 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 227 - Colonies which have not already adopted such a policy should, as far as their circumstances permit, give substantial preferential treatment to the products and manufactures of the United Kingdom. || ,,4. That the Prime Ministers of the Colonies respectfully urge on His Majesty's Government the expediency of granting in the United Kingdom preferential treatment to the products and manufactures of the Colonies, either by exemption from or reduction of duties now or hereafter imposed. || ,,5. That the...
Page 227 - Conference was as follows : — " 1. That this Conference recognises that the principle of preferential trade between the United Kingdom and His Majesty's Dominions beyond the seas would stimulate .and facilitate mutual commercial intercourse, and would, by promoting the development of the resources and industries of the several parts, strengthen the Empire.
Page 24 - Country, and more a case of a healthy and cordial alliance. Instead of looking upon us as a merely dependent colony, England will have in us a friendly nation— a subordinate but still a powerful people — to stand by her in North America in peace or in war.
Page 227 - Seas. (3) That with a view, however, to promoting the increase of trade within the Empire, it is desirable that those Colonies which have not already adopted such a policy should, as far as their circumstances permit, give substantial preferential treatment to the products and manufactures of the United Kingdom.
Page 24 - America in peace or in war. The people of Australia will be such another subordinate nation. And England will have this advantage, if her colonies progress under the new colonial system, as I believe they will, that, though at war with all the rest of the world, she will be able to look to the subordinate nations in alliance with her, and owning allegiance to the same sovereign, who will assist in enabling her again to meet the whole world in arms, as she has done before.
Page 93 - Canadian feels in this no sense of injustice or tyranny, since he ia represented in the superior as well as in the inferior Legislature, so the colonist would feel no loss of political dignity if he had his true place in the higher as well as in the lower representative body. With enlarged powers, it is true, the colony would have to accept enlarged responsibilities. In human affairs the two invariably and rightly go together.
Page 235 - ... lesser of two evils that it should be repealed rather than used as a first step in a policy of preference or protection." But in the light of the existing state of the finances he clearly regretted that the country should have been deprived of the 2,500,000 derivable from the tax which, he said, " I still think, as I told the House two years ago, when once established would do very little practical harm to anybody, whatever might be said against it in theory, and the repeal of which, so far...
Page 84 - England annuls ultra vires or unconstitutional acts of the Dominion of Canada, the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Union of South Africa. The...
Page 43 - ... the spirit in which contributions have been made in the past and will, no doubt, be made in the future. It is, of course, possible to over-estimate the importance of the requirements of the oversea dominions as a factor in our expenditure; but, however this may be, the cost of naval defence and the responsibility for the conduct of foreign affairs hang together.
Page 194 - ... Britannic unity — the dependence of intimate political association on the "unification of economic interest". As expressed in The Britannic Question his conception of the Britannic Alliance was based on the theory that "in democratic communities the integrating force which tends to make them 'organic' is not the compulsive power of a central government but the conscious sense of mutual aid in living of which the public policy must be an expression if the 'unity

Bibliographic information