The Medico-chirurgical Review, Volume 47

Front Cover
S. Highley, 1845 - Medicine
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 185 - Latham on Diseases of the Heart. Lectures on Subjects connected with Clinical Medicine: Diseases of the Heart.
Page 327 - Moore.— The Power of the Soul over the Body, considered in relation to Health and Morals. By GEORGE MOORE, MD, Member of the Royal College of Physicians.
Page 510 - Vive, vale ; si quid novisti rectius istis, Candidus impertí ; si non, his utere mecum.
Page 8 - I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which, as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.
Page 206 - These words, good brother, are written in holy Scripture, for our comfort and instruction ; that we should patiently, and with thanksgiving, bear our heavenly Father's correction, whensoever, by any manner of adversity, it shall please his gracious goodness to visit us. And there should be no greater comfort to Christian persons, than to be made like unto Christ, by suffering patiently adversities, troubles, and sicknesses. For he himself went not up to joy, but first he suffered pain : He entered...
Page 431 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain, But with the motion of all elements Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page 440 - ... pallor in ore sedet, macies in corpore toto, nusquam recta acies, livent rubigine dentes, pectora feile virent, lingua est suffusa veneno...
Page 444 - ... she continued sitting while we were asking questions and conversing, so that many minutes must have passed. One arm was now raised, then the other, and where they were left, there they remained; it was now a curious sight to see her, sitting up in bed, her eyes open, staring lifelessly, her arms outstretched, yet without any visible sign of animation; she was very thin and pallid, and looked like a corpse that had been propped up, and had stiffened in this attitude.

Bibliographic information