Revolution, Romanticism, and the Afro-Creole Protest Tradition in Louisiana, 1718--1868

Front Cover
LSU Press, 1997 - History - 344 pages

With the Federal occupation of New Orleans in 1862, Afro-Creole leaders in that city, along with their white allies, seized upon the ideals of the American and French Revolutions and images of revolutionary events in the French Caribbean and demanded LibertÚ, EgalitÚ, FraternitÚ. Their republican idealism produced the postwar South's most progressive vision of the future. Caryn CossÚ Bell, in her impressive, sweeping study, traces the eighteenth-century origins of this Afro-Creole political and intellectual heritage, its evolution in antebellum New Orleans, and its impact on the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Revolution and the Origins of Dissent
9
The Republican Cause and the AfroCreole Militia
41
The New American Racial Order
65
Romanticism Social Protest and Reform
89
French Freemasonry and the Republican Heritage
145
Spiritualisms Dissident Visionaries
187
War Reconstruction and the Politics of Radicalism
222
Conclusion
276
Membership in Two Masonic Lodges and Biographical Information
283
Bibliography
295
Index
313
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - We are Natives of this Province and our dearest Interests are connected with its welfare. We therefore feel a lively Joy that the Sovereignty of the Country is at length united with that of the American Republic. We are duly sensible that our personal and political freedom is thereby assured to us...

About the author (1997)

Caryn Coss Bell is an assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.

Bibliographic information