The Bulletin of the U.S. Army Medical Department

Front Cover
War Department, Office of the Surgeon General., 1949
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - When we are offered a penny for our thoughts we always find that we have recently had so many things in mind that we can easily make- a selection which will not compromise us too nakedly. On inspection we shall find that even if we are not downright ashamed of a great part of our spontaneous thinking it is far too intimate, personal, ignoble or trivial to permit us to reveal more than a small part of it.
Page 540 - But by far the greatest obstacle to the progress of science and to the undertaking of new tasks and provinces therein, is found in this — that men despair and think things impossible. For wise and serious men are wont in these matters to be altogether distrustful ; considering with themselves the obscurity of nature, the shortness of life, the deceitfulness of the senses, the weakness of the...
Page 630 - An ordinary standard for diverse persons is one milliliter for each calorie of food. Most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods. At work or in hot weather, requirements may reach 5 to 13 liters daily. Water should be allowed ad libitum, since sensations of thirst usually serve as adequate guides to intake except for infants and sick persons.
Page 630 - Available evidence indicates that the phosphorus allowances should be at least equal to those for calcium in the diets of children and of women during the latter part of pregnancy and during lactation. In the case of other adults the phosphorus allowances should be approximately 1.5 times those for calcium.
Page 436 - Museum, medical officers are directed diligently to collect and to forward to the office of the Surgeon-General, all specimens of morbid anatomy, surgical or medical, which may be regarded as valuable ; together with projectiles and foreign bodies removed, and such other matters as may prove of interest in the study of military medicine or surgery.
Page 630 - Vitamin K. The requirement for vitamin K usually is satisfied by any good diet except for the infant in utero and for the first few days after birth. Supplemental vitamin K is recommended during the last month of pregnancy. When it has not been given in this manner, it is recommended for the mother preceding delivery or for the baby immediately after birth.
Page 34 - When a patient enters a hospital, the first thing that commonly happens to him is that he loses his personal identity. He is generally referred to, not as Henry Jones, but as "that case of mitral stenosis in the second bed on the left." There are plenty of reasons why this is so, and the point is, in itself, relatively unimportant; but the trouble is that it leads, more or less directly, to the patient being treated as a case of mitral stenosis, and not as a sick man. The disease...
Page 44 - ... are offered a penny for our thoughts we always find that we have recently had so many things in mind that we can easily make a selection which will not compromise us too nakedly. On inspection we shall find that even if we are not downright ashamed of a great part of our spontaneous thinking it is far too intimate, personal, ignoble or trivial to permit us to reveal more than a small part of it. I believe this must be true of everyone.
Page 885 - An Act to authorize Federal assistance to States and local governments in major disasters, and for other purposes...
Page 630 - It has been shown that after acclimatization persons produce sweat that contains only about 0.5 gram to the liter in contrast with a content of 2 to 3 grams for sweat of the unacclimatized person. Consequently after acclimatization, need for increase of salt beyond that of ordinary food disappears.

Bibliographic information