Page images
PDF
EPUB

The Estate remains now vested in said Willing and Biddle, at this date, 1873

The Trustees, Willing and Biddle, by Letter of Attorney dated August 20, 1853, recorded vol. 146, folio 130, appointed Lucilius A. Emery* of Ellsworth, in the State of Maine, their Attorney to manage that part of the Estate within the State of Maine, with full powers, except to execute deeds, which said Letter of Attorney remains unrevoked at this date, 1873.

PASSAGASSAWAKEAG-RIVER-BELFAST.

THE MEANING OF PASSAGASSAWAKEAG.

Among the historical materials procured by the research and munificence of Mr. James P. Baxter of Portland, during his recent sojourn abroad, is a copy of the earliest correct map of Penobscot Bay known to exist. The original was never printed, and had remained forgotten in the English archives until discovered by Mr. Baxter.

During 1759, as is well known, this section of the country was formally occupied by a body of troops under the command of Governor Pownall, who erected the fort which bore his name, at the mouth of Penobscot river. The map referred to was made by engineers attached to this expedition, and designates many familiar localities by their present names.

At a distance of thirty miles by land from St. Georges Fort, which stood on the site of Thomaston, the surveying party reached the river or estuary forming Belfast harbor, and were there met by the armed vessels. The map indicates this river as “Taufeguse-wa-keag, or Sturgeon River,” a definition which confirms the idea that sturgeon is in some way connected with or at least forms a portion of the old Indian name. Passag has been regarded as derivative from Pahsukus, the Etcheinin word for that fish. In the Indian dialect wa means clear, or smooth, and keag means place. I do not find the prefix Taufeguse in any Indian vocabulary.

Governor Pownall's journal of the expedition gives the name as Pausegasawackeag. Upon a map made by order of Governor Bernard, in 1764, it appears as 'Segaseweset.

Fort Point indicated as Wasaumkeag Neck," has a prominent position. The fort, log redoubt, garden, avenue, and other places are accurately located. The exact spot where, on the east side of Penobscot river, “at the top of a high piked hill about three miles above marine nagivation," where Governor Pownall buried a leaden plate containing his formal certificate of possession in behalf of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, is also delineated, and by measurements, seems to be in the town of Eddington.

- Joseph Williamson, in Belfast Journal.

The Attornevs of the Estate have been David Cobb, John Black, George N. Black, Eugene Hale, Lucilius A. Emery.

118 Officers of the Drafted Troops in the Aroostook War 1839.

THE OFFICERS OF THE DRAFTED TROOPS IN

THE AROOSTOOK WAR, 1839.

[ocr errors]

60

66

The following are the names of Company Commanders and number of men in each Company, as appears from the Pay Rolls of the various companies of Maine Militia, drafted and called in actual service by the State for the protection of the North-eastern Frontier in 1839. “Capt. Albion P. Arnold's Co. of Artillery, 2 officers, 50 men. Zachariah Gibson's

4

61 Enoch R. Lumbert's

4

76
Nathaniel Barker's

Light Inf.
3

70
Daniel Dority's

3

82 Nathan Ellis', Jr.,

3

69 S. A. Holbrook's

3

71 James Hayford's

3

81 Timothy Ludden's

3

65 Joseph Perry's

3

62 Joseph Anthony's

46 Henry Bailey's

3 Benjamin Beal's

3

40 John G. Barrard's

3

59 Samuel Burrell's

3

57 Hiram Burnham's

3

54 James Clark's

3

81 D. W. Clark's

3 Reuben Crane's

3

65 Sampson Dunham's

3

53 Josiah L. Elder's

3

50 Nathaniel Frost's

3

60 Samuel L. Fish's

3

76 John Gardiner's

3

32 Isaac Green's

3

68
Joshua T. Hall's
Charles R. Hamblet's “

3
William S. Hains'
James C. Harper's

3

63 David H. Haskell's Lieut. Hiram Hamilton's

43 Capt. Eliphalet I. Maxfield's "

3 George W. Maxim's

3

73 Amos T. Noyes

3

55 Stillman Nash's

3 Hiram Pollard's

3

65 Lieut. Israel W. Woodward's"!

32

[ocr errors]

66

41 76 38

58

75

67

66

Capt. Stephen Leighton's Co. of Riflemen 3 officers, 82 men.
John D. Kinsman's

3
William Mills'

3 Lieut. Hiram Pishon's Capt. David R. Ripley's

3

57 Nathaniel Sawyer's

67 Charles H. Wing's

44 Reuben Smart's

Cavalry

52

SANT

دو دن دن

129 2736

ARCHIVES OF MAINE.

SAMUEL WHITE'S COMPLAINT, 1798.

Samuel White, of Colburnton Plantation (now Orono), Clerk of Capt. Joseph Mansell's Company, complains to Jonathan Eddy, Esquire "that William McPhetres, Thaddeus Adams, David Orcutt, Eber Hathorn, Isaac Page, John Spencer, John Spencer, Jr., Benjamin Spencer, Emerson Orcutt, Jr., Gates Hathorn, Minor, Benjamin Stanley, John Reed, James McPhetres, Allen McLaughlin, Isaac Spencer and Levi Low, all belonging to Capt. Joseph Mapsell's Company, being duly warned to appear at Lieutenant William Colburn's dwelling house in Colburnton Plantation the first day of said May, in order to review

but did not appear nor send their equipments to be viewed ; furthermore, David Orcutt for disobedience of orders in not returning the warrant he had to warn the company, and Joseph Inman, Jr., for leaving the ranks when under command being contrary to orders. Moses Spencer, Samuel Spencer, William Spencer, Stephen Mann, Francis Robeshaw and Rufus Inman, for not being equipped, all of which is contrary to the laws of the Commonwealth, and your complainant desires that you would grant citations to cite them that they may show cause if any they have, why they did not appear at training and why they were not equipped, and why they did not obey orders. Dated at Colburnton, June 23d, 1798. Samuel White, Clerk.'

ORRINGTON POST OFFICE, 1803.

This office was established at what is now South Brewer, 1800. Col. John Brewer was ihe first postmaster. The present postmaster at South Brewer, Capt. Daniel Shed, has the same desk which was used by Col. Brewer.

THE POST-OFFICE AT ORRINGTON IN ACCOUNT CURRENT WITH THE GENERAL POST-OFFICE, FROM JULY 1, 1801, TO OCTOBER

IST, 1801.

DR.

[blocks in formation]

To postage of letters which remained in the office last quarter,
To postage of unpaid letters received from o:her offices this quarter,
To postage of way letters received at this office ditto,
To postage of letters undercharged from other offices ditto,
To postage of ship letters at 6 cents each originally received at this

office for this delivery,
To postage of paid letters sent from this office ditto,

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

To balance as above, being the amount of postage collected on letters this

quarter, To amount of postage on news-papers and pamphlets this quarter, Deduct postage of dead news-papers and pamphlets,

Dollars

[ocr errors][merged small]

The postmaster should sign his name to this account and the transcripts accompanying it.

CR.

Dol.

By postage of letters overcharged and missent this quarter,
By postage of dead letters sent to the General Post Office ditto,
By postage of letters now remaining in this office,

Balance carried down,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

0.66%,

[blocks in formation]

By 8 free letters delivered out of this office this quarter at 2 cents each,

$0.16, By commission on 7 D. 64 C. Letter Postage, at 30 per cent, 2.29, By ditto on —

D. - C. Letter Postage, at 25 per cent, By ditto on 1 D. 33 C. Newspaper Postage, at 50 per cent, By

ship letters paid for this quarter as by receipts herewith at 2 cents

each,
By cash paid the mail carrier for 10 way letters at 1 cent each,
By contingent expences as by receipts herewith,
Balance due to the General Post Office,

Dollars
[FROM THE ORIGINAL)

[blocks in formation]

HISTORICAL NOTES.

The Congregational church in Perry was burned Nov. 18th 1890. The house was built in 1829, at a cost of two thousand dollars.

Dany are the expressions of regret which come to us from former residents of Perry, that the old meeting house has been burned. Fifty years ago the people of Perry were emphatically a churchgoing people. There were but few vacant pews in the church at the morning and afternoon services. How well do we remember the occupants of every pew. With paper and pencil we could draw a plan of the interior of the house, and write the names of the occupants of every pew,

The Lincolns, Bugbees, Pottles, Stoddards, Frosts, Nutts, Palmer, Gleason, Eaton, Cook, Lorings, Tuttles, Potters, Browns, Gouldings, Reed, Patterson, Stickneys, Trotts, Gibson, Hibbard, Leighton, Leland, Crowney, Moore, Bulmer, Lowell, Mahar, Cox, Pritchard, Head, Hudson, Johnsons, Goves, Clarks, Leach, Pattangall, Rogers, Dana, Wilson, Boydens, Davis.- Eastport Sentinel.

Province of

Massachusetts Bay, } In Council, 11 April, 1971.

The two Houses according to Agreement proceeded to the choice of Civil officers for the present year, when John Wheelwright, Esq'r was chosen Truckmaster for Fort Pownal by a major. Vote of the Council and House of Representatives.

attest (signed) Thos. FLUCKER, Sec'y. Not Consented to,

(signed) T. HUTCHINSON.
(written on the back of the paper)

Truckmaster chosen for

Fort Pownal,
April 11th, 1771.
vetoed by Gov. Hutchinson.

-Massachusetts Archives, Dr. 7. F. Pratt,

AN OLD ISLESBOROUGH LEASE, 1771. It is a lease, lately turned up in Gardiner, of an inn sold in Penobscot bay, “in the county of Lincoln,” known as Winslow island or Long island (by which last name it is now known) and runs from “Isaac Winslow of Roxbury in the county of Suffolk, Esq.," to William Pendleton. The lease is for 25 years and runs in the usual form, one of its provisions being that “the said Pendleton shall be careful not to plow the same piece of land too often, and such as he does plow he is to dung properly, and to sow down with grass seed. The document was signed the 20th of November, 1771, and after the lapse of one hundred and seventeen years the writing is as legible and all the dames as plain as if written yesterday. It has been in Officer Sprague's possession four or five years, and was rescured from the stock room of one of our paper mills.-Kennebec Journal.

« PreviousContinue »