Supplementary Despatches and Memoranda of Field Marshal Arthur, Duke of Wellington, K. G.: India, 1797-1805

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 266 - In order to secure and improve the relations of amity and peace hereby established between the two states, it is agreed that accredited ministers from each shall reside at the court of the other.
Page 212 - Another evil resulting from it was, that we had then no reserve left, and a parcel of stragglers cut up our wounded ; and straggling infantry, who had pretended to be dead, turned their guns upon our backs. ' After all, notwithstanding this attack upon Assye by our right and the cavalry, no impression was made upon the corps collected there, till I made a movement upon it with some troops taken from our left, after the enemy's right had been defeated ; and it would have been as well to have left...
Page 211 - ... about to follow, but was still on the ground : at all events, it was necessary to ascertain these points, and I could not venture to reconnoitre without my whole force. But I believed the report to be true, and I determined to attack the infantry if it remained still upon the ground. I apprised Colonel Stevenson of this determination, and desired him to move forward. Upon marching on I found not only their infantry but their cavalry encamped in a most formidable position which, by the by, it...
Page 211 - ... difficult to secure my baggage, as I did, in any place so near the enemy's camp, in which they should know it was. I therefore determined upon the attack immediately. It was certainly a most desperate one ; but our guns were not silenced. Our bullocks, and the people who were employed to draw...
Page 97 - ... necessity, he cannot venture to stop to plunder the country, and he does comparatively but little mischief: at all events the subsistence of his army becomes difficult and precarious, the horsemen become dissatisfied, they perceive that their situation is hopeless, and they desert in numbers daily : the freebooter ends by having with him only a few adherents; and he is reduced to such a state as to be liable to be taken by any small body of country horse, which are the fittest troops to be then...
Page 213 - The reason for which he was detained till that day was, that I might have the benefit of the assistance of his surgeons to dress my wounded soldiers, many of whom, after all, were not dressed for nearly a week, for want of the necessary number of medical men. I had also a long and difficult negotiation with the Nizam's Sirdars, to induce them to admit my wounded into any of the Nizam's forts ; and I could not allow them to depart until I had settled .that point. Besides, I knew that the enemy had...
Page 385 - From all this statement you will observe that the system of moderation and conciliation by which, whether it be right or wrong, I made the treaties of peace, and which has been so highly approved and extolled, is now given up.
Page 213 - Asseerghur on the 21st; I heard the intelligence on the 24th, and that the Rajah of Berar had come to the south with an army. I ascended the Ghaut on the 25th, and have• marched...
Page 286 - Treaty abovementioned, such refusal shall not affect any of the other stipulations of this treaty of Peace, which are, in every respect, to be binding on the contracting parties, their heirs and successors.
Page 265 - DEC. 30, 1803. 265 are situated to the northward of the countries of the Rajahs of Jeypoor and Joudpoor, and of the Ranah of Gohud, and that lands in...

Bibliographic information