ESSAY ON THE CHARACTER AND INFLUENCE OF WASHINGTON IN THE REVOLUTION ON THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 153 - I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence, and that after forty-five years of my life dedicated to its service, with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be to the mansions of rest.
Page 153 - I promise myself to realize, without alloy, the sweet enjoyment of partaking, in the midst of my fellow-citizens, the benign influence of good laws under a free Government — the ever favorite object of my heart — and the happy reward, as I trust, of our mutual cares, labors, and dangers.
Page 100 - Their creed is, that the property of the United States has been protected from the confiscation of Britain by the joint exertions of all ; and therefore ought to be the common property of all ; and he that attempts opposition to this creed is an enemy to equity and justice, and ought to be swept from off the face of the earth.
Page 45 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold, bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets.
Page 92 - About ten o'clock I bade adieu to Mount Vernon, to private life, and to domestic felicity; and, with a mind oppressed with more anxious and painful sensations than I have words to express, set out for New York in company with Mr.
Page 45 - ... distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets. However, although they seem to have little feeling for the naked and distressed soldiers, I feel superabundantly for them, and from my soul I pity those miseries, which it is neither in my power to relieve nor prevent.
Page 51 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 31 - I think I can announce it as a fact, that it is not the wish or interest of that government, or any other upon this continent, separately or collectively, to set up for independence...
Page 58 - Sit down, Mr. Washington ; your modesty equals your valor, and that surpasses the power of any language I possess.
Page 118 - I shall not, whilst I have the honor to administer the government, bring a man into any office of consequence knowingly, whose political tenets are adverse to the measures, which the general government are pursuing ; for this, in my opinion, would be a sort of political suicide.

Bibliographic information