The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volumes 1-11; Volume 12, Parts 1-3; Volumes 13-16; Volume 17, Parts 1-2; Volume 18; Volume 19, Parts 1-2; Volumes 20-22; Volume 23, Parts 1-2; Volume 24, Parts 1-3; Volume 25, Parts 1-2; Volume 26, Parts 1-2; Volume 27, Parts 1-3; Volume 28, Parts 1-2; Volume 29, Parts 1-2; Volume 30; Volume 31, Parts 1-3; Volume 32, Parts 1-3; Volume 33; Volume 34, Parts 1-4; Volume 35, Parts 1-2; Volume 36, Parts 1-3; Volume 37, Parts 1-2; Volume 38, Parts 1-5; Volume 39, Parts 1-3; Volume 40, Parts 1-3; Volume 41, Parts 1-4; Volume 42, Parts 1-3; Volume 43, Parts 1-2; Volume 44; Volume 45, Parts 1-2; Volume 46, Parts 1-3; Volume 47, Parts 1-3; Volume 48, Parts 1-2; Volume 49, Parts 1-2; Volume 50, Parts 1-2; Volume 51, Parts 1-2; Volumes 52-53; Volume 56; Volumes 58-59; Volume 62; Volume 81; Volume 83; Volumes 101-102; Volumes 118-121; Volumes 124-125

Front Cover
Found also in the House Miscellaneous documents of the 52 to the 56th Congress./ Each number has special index. Inserted in each volume: Additions and corrections ... Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1902./ Series 1,v. 1-53, series 3,v. 1-5, and series 4,v. 1-3 include "Alternate designations of organizations mentioned." /Vol 54-55 of series 1 (serial no. 112-113)"HAVE NOT BEEN PUBLISHED, AND NO MATERIAL FOR THEM IS IN HAND." cf. General Index, p. xi. Series 2,v. 1 (serial no. 114) with imprint 1894, was not issued until 1898./ Edited in the War Records Office, 1880-July 1899; in the Record and Pension Office, July 1899-1901 Robert N. Scott compiled and edited v. 1-18, 1880-87, and also collected the greater part of the material for v. 19-36, 1887-91. After his death in 1887 the work was continued by Henry M. Lazelle, 1887-89, and by a board of publication, 1889-99, consisting of George B. Davis, 1889-97, Leslie J. Perry, 1889-99, Joseph W. Kirkley, 1889-99,and Fred C. Ainsworth, 1898-99; from 1889-1901 edited by Fred C. Ainsworth and Joseph W. Kirkley. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by Cornell University is available from Cornell University's Making of America Web Site.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 55 - AM to-day could lead to no good. I will state, however, General, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed.
Page 56 - Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy to be given to an officer to be designated by me, the other to be retained by such officer or officers as you may designate. The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company and regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands.
Page 54 - April 7, 1865. GENERAL : The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the army of Northern Virginia.
Page 55 - GENERAL: — I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the terms of your proposition.
Page 10 - General Sherman was instructed to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to go into the interior of the enemy's country as far as he could, inflicting all the damage he could upon their war resources. If the enemy in his front showed signs of joining Lee, to follow him up to the full extent of his ability, while I would prevent the concentration of Lee upon him, if it was in the power of the Army of the Potomac to do so. More specific written instructions were not given, for the reason...
Page 46 - Bay with about thirty-eight thousand mixed troops, these three latter pushing for Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery, and Sherman with a large army eating out the vitals of South Carolina, is all that will be wanted to leave nothing for the rebellion to stand upon. I would advise you to overcome great obstacles to accomplish this. Charleston was evacuated on Tuesday last.
Page 10 - ... Pulaski, and Port Royal, in South Carolina ; Fernandina and St. Augustine, in Florida. Key West and Pensacola were also in our possession, while all the important ports were blockaded by the navy. The accompanying map, a copy of which was sent to General Sherman, and other commanders, in March, 1864, shows, by red lines the territory occupied by us at the beginning of the rebellion, and at the opening of the campaign of 1864 ; while those in blue are the lines which it was proposed to occupy.
Page 19 - ... fighting. The battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna and Cold Harbor, bloody and terrible as they were on our side, were even more damaging to the enemy, and so crippled him as to make him wary ever after of taking the offensive. His losses in men were probably not so great, owing to the fact that we were, save in the Wilderness, almost invariably the attacking party ; and when he did attack, it was in the open field.
Page 15 - But the enemy having become apprised of our movement, and having the shorter line, was enabled to reach there first. On the 8th, General Warren met a force of the enemy, which had been sent out to oppose and delay his advance, to gain time to fortify the line taken up at Spottsylvania. This force was steadily driven back on the main force, within the recently constructed works, after considerable fighting, resulting in severe loss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started...
Page 21 - Corps, reached General Smith just after dark and offered the service of these troops as he [Smith] might wish, waiving rank to the named commander, who he naturally supposed knew best the position of affairs and what to do with the troops. But instead of taking these troops and pushing at once into Petersburg, he requested General Hancock to relieve a part of his line in the captured works, which was done before midnight.