Page images
PDF
EPUB

OF THE

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

OF THE

ILLINOIS INDUSTRIAL UNIVERSITY,

FROM THEIR ORGANIZATION, MARCH 12, 1867,

TO TIE

CLOSE OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR,

JUNE 18, 1868.

SPRINGFIELD:

491-
BAKER, BAILHACHE & CO. PRINTERS.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

"The use of manual labor is one which never grows obsolete, and which is inapplicable to no porgon. A man should have a farm or a mechanical craft for his culture. We must have a ba-is for our higher accomplishments, our delicate entertainments of poetry and philosophy, in the work of our bands, We must have an antagonism in the tough world for all the variety of our spiritual faculties, or they will not be born.

“In general, one may bay, that the husbandman's is the oldest and most universal profession, and that where a man does not yet discover in himself any fitness for one work more than another, this may be preferred. Bat the doctrine of the Farm is merely this, that every man ought to stand in primary relations with the work of the world; ought to do himself, and not to suffer the accident of his having a purse in his pocket, or his having been bred to some dishonorable and injurious craft, to sever him from those duties; and for this reason, that labor is God's pd cation; that he only is a sincere learner, he only can become a master, who learns the secrets of labor, and who by real cunning extorts from nature its sceptre."-Emerson, Miscellanies, p. 228-232.

“He must watch the elements: must understand the nature of the soil he tills, the character and habits of each animal that serves him as a living instrum nt. Each day makes large claims on him for knowledge and sound judgment. He is to arply good sense to the soil. Now these demands tend to foster the habit of observing and judging justly: to increase thought and elevate the man."

“To the instructed man his trade is a study: the toils of his craft are books: his farm a gospel, eloquent in its sublime sllence: his cattle and corn are te chers: the stars his guides to virtue and to God; and every mute avd every living thing, by shore or sea, a heaven-sent prophet to refine his mind and heart. He is in harmony with nature, and his edacatiou goes on with the earth and the hours."-Theodore Parker's Miscellanies, p. 147-259.

"The chief interest of the country is the business of every citizen; and if statesmen had oftener remembered that the test of natioual welfare is the intelligence and prosperity of the farmer, States would have been more wisely governed and human society happier; for his pur. buit touches the very springs of civilization and employs two-thirds of the human race."--George William Curtis' Address, 1865.

"The END of all education should be the development of a TRUE MANHOOD, or the natural, proportionate and healthful culture and growth of all the powers and faculties of the human beingpbysical, mental, moral and social: and any system which attempts the exclusive or evez inordinate culture of any one class of these faculties, will fail of its erd-it will make mushrooms and monke, rather than manhood and men.'_J. B. Turner, 1853.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »