A Digest of the International Law of the United States: Taken from Documents Issued by Presidents and Secretaries of State, and from Decisions of Federal Courts and Opinions of Attorneys-general, Volume 1

Front Cover
Francis Wharton
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1886 - Government publications
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

6 And so of foreign sending of paupers and criwivals ſ
16
STRAITS
29
2 Nicaragua 293
38
SPECIAL TREATIESContinued
39
EXCEPTION AS TO NECESSITY V 17
50
1 Predatory Indians 18
56
3 Diversion or obstruction of water 20
62
WHEN HARM IS DONE BY ORDER OF FOREIGN SOVEREIGN SECH SOVEREIGN IS THE ACCOUNTABLE PARTY 21
64
TERRITORIAL BOUNDARIES DETERMINED BY POLITICAL NOT JUDICIAL ACTION 22 CHAPTER II
69
SOVEREIGNTY OVER 26
70
Bays 28
75
FISHERIES
76
Rivers 30
81
LAKES AND INLAND SEAS 31
99
MARGINAL BELT OF SEA 32
100
CONTINGENT FUND AND SECRET SERVICE MONEY
108
SELFCONSTITUTED MISSIONS ILLEGAL
109
PRESENTS NOT ALLOWED
110
ELIGIBILITY OF
113
APPOINTMENT AND QUALIFYING OF
114
EXEQUATUR
115
DISMISSAL
116
SHIP NATIONALIZED BY FLAG 33
117
VICECONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS
118
NOT TO TAKE PART IN POLITICS V
119
PRIVILEGE AS TO PROCESS
120
OTHER PRIVILEGES
121
Rigut TO GIVE ASYLUM AND PROTECTION
122
CRIMES AT SEA SUBJECT TO COUNTRY OF FLAG 0
123
PORT JURISDICTION OF SEAMEN AND SHIPPING
124
JUDICIAL FUNCTIONS IN SEMICIVILIZED LANDS
125
PORTS OPEN TO ALL NATIONS 34
127
I MERCHANT VESSELS SUBJECT TO POLICE LAW OF PORT 35
128
NEGOTIATION
130
RATIFICATION AND APPROVAL 1 As to treaty making power
131
WHEN TREATY GOES INTO EFFECT
132
CONSTRUCTION AND INTERPRETATION
133
FAVORED NATION
134
EFFECT OF
135
CRIMES ON SUCH VESSELS HOW FAR SUBJECT TO PORT LAWS 35a XIII NOT SO AS TO PUBLIC Ships 36
136
EFFECT OF
137
TREATIES WHEN CONSTITUTIONAL ARE THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND BUT MAY BE MUNICIPALLY MODIFIED BY SUBSEQUE...
138
JUDICIARY CANNOT CONTROL EXECUTIVE IN TREATY MAKING V
139
OPPRESSIVE PORT EXACTIONS V 37
140
2 AustriaHungary
141
3 Barbary Powers 141a 4 Bavaria
142
5 Brazil
143
6 China ở
144
7 Colombia and New Granada
145
8 Costa Rica and Honduras
146
9 Denmark
147
IN CASES OF PIRACY
159
ARMING MERCHANT VESSELS 39
167
NEUTRALIZED WATERS 40
169
CHAPTER III
171
TERRITORIAL CHANGE
187
ALIENS
201
CORPORATIONS
207
5 Mediation 49
211
PRACTICE AS TO PROOF AND PROCESS
218
6 Necessity as where marauders can be checked only by such intervention 0 50
221
a Amelia Island
222
11 Good offices for persecuted Jews 55
249
MODE OF SOLEMNIZATION
260
12 Nonprohibition of publications or subscriptions in aid of political action
264
abroad 56
265
13 Charitable contributions abroad 56a III INTERVENTION OF EUROPEAN SOVEREIGNS IN AFFAIRS OF THIS CONTINENT DIS APPROVED...
268
MUST BE SPECIFIC FOREIGN DEMAND
274
PRACTICE AS TO SURRENDER
280
NORTHEAST ATLANTIC FISHERIES
301
TITLE IN INTERNATIONAL
310
SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF DOCTRINE 1 Mexico 58
327
CHAPTER XVII
333
WHEN EXEMYS CHARACTER IS IMPUTABLE TO NEUTRALS
352
2 Peru 59
353
CHAPTER XVIII
358
3 Cuba 0 60
362
PACIFIC BLOCKADE
364
4 San Domingo and Hayti 8 61
411
5 Danish West Indies
416
Sandwich Islands 0 62
417
7 Samoa Caroline and other Pacific Islands 63
436
8 Corea 64
442
9 Falkland Islands 65
443
10 Liberia 0 66
445
11 China ở 67
492
RECOGNITION OF BELLIGERENCY 69
509
RECOGNITION OF SOVEREIGNTY 70
521
SUCH RECOGNITION DETERMINABLE BY EXECUTIVE 71
551
ACCRETION NOT COLONIZATION THE POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES V
553
TREATIES WITH
575
XXI
581
DIPLOMATIC AGENTS I EXECUTIVE THE SOURCE OF DIPLOMATIC AUTHORITY 0 78
582
FOREIGN MINISTERS TO RECOGNIZE THE SECRETARY OF STATE AS THE SOLE ORGAN OF THE EXECUTIVE 79
585
EXECUTIVE DISCRETION DETERMINES THE WITHDRAWAL OR RENEWAL or MISSIONS AND MINISTERS V
592
NONACCEPTABLE MINISTER MAY BE REFUSED 82
596
Not USUAL TO ASK AS TO ACCEPTABILITY IN ADVANCE
599
MINISTER MISCONDUCTING HIMSELF MAY BE SENT BACK 84
603
MODE OF PRESENTATION AND TAKING LEAVE V 85
612
INCUMBENT CONTINUES UNTIL ARRIVAL OF SUCCESSOR 86
616
How FAR DOMESTIC CHANGE OF GOVERNMENT OPERATES TO RECALL 87
618
DIPLOMATIC GRADES V 88
627
CITIZENS OF COUNTRY OF RECEPTION NOT ACCEPTABLE
628
1 Confined to official business
632
2 Usually in writing 89b XV DIPLOMATIC AGENTS TO ACT UNDER INSTRUCTIONS 90
633
COMMUNICATIONS FROM FOREIGNERS ONLY TO BE RECEIVED THROUGH DIPLOMATIC REPRESENTATIVES 91
635
DIPLOMATIC AGENTS PROTECTED FROM PROCESS 1 Who are so privileged 92
638
2 Illegality of process against 93
644
3 Exemption from criminal prosecution
646
4 What attack on a minister is an international offence 936
648
AND FROM PERSONAL INDIGNITY 94
649
AND FROM TAXES AND IMPOSTS 97
651
PROPERTY PROTECTED 96
654
FREE TRANSIT AND COMMUNICATION WITH SECURED 97
655
PRIVILEGED FROM TESTIFYING 98
667
CANNOT BECOME BUSINESS AGENTS 99
670
NOR REPRESENT FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS V 100
671
SHOULD RESIDE AT CAPITAL 101
672
DUTIES AS TO ARCHIVES 103
673
RIGHT OF PROTECTION AND ASYLUM 104
675
MIY EXTEND PROTECTION TO CITIZENS OF FRIENDLY COUNTRIES N 105
696
10 France
755
a Treaty of 1778 148
760

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 564 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Page 274 - It is impossible that the allied powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness; nor can any one believe that our Southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt It of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition, in any form, with indifference.
Page 273 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power.
Page 168 - ... to any other practicable communications, whether by canal or railway, across the isthmus which connects North and South America, and especially to the interoceanic communications, should the same prove to be practicable, whether by canal or railway, which are now proposed to be established by the way of Tehuantepec or Panama.
Page 273 - At the proposal of the Russian Imperial Government, made through the Minister of the Emperor residing here, a full power and instructions have been transmitted to the Minister of the United States at St. Petersburg, to arrange, by amicable negotiation, the respective rights and interests of the two nations on the north-west coast of this Continent.
Page 269 - I candidly confess that I have ever looked on Cuba as the most interesting addition which could ever be made to our system of States. The control which, with Florida point, this island would give us over the Gulf of Mexico, and the countries and isthmus bordering on it, as well as all those whose waters flow into .it, would fill up the measure of our political well-being.
Page 81 - Canal on terms of equality with the inhabitants of the United States, and further engages to urge upon the State governments to secure to the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty the use of the several State canals...
Page 274 - This difference proceeds from that which exists in their respective governments and to the defense of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens and under which we have enjoyed unexampled felicity, this whole nation is devoted.
Page 273 - In the wars of the European powers, in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do. It is only when our rights are invaded or seriously menaced, that we resent injuries or make preparation for our defence.
Page 200 - Born, sir, in a land of liberty; having early learned its value; having engaged in a perilous conflict to defend it; having, in a word, devoted the best years of my life to secure its permanent establishment in my own country, my anxious recollections, my sympathetic feelings, and my best wishes are irresistibly excited whensoever in any country I see an oppressed nation unfurl the banners of freedom.

Bibliographic information