Woodrow Wilson: An Interpretation

Front Cover
Little, Brown,, 1918 - 291 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 236 - There is one choice we cannot make, we are incapable of making — we will not choose the path of submission and suffer the most sacred rights of our nation and our people to be ignored or violated.
Page 229 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 133 - The United States must be neutral in fact as well as in name during these days that are to try men's souls. We must be impartial in thought as well as in action...
Page 266 - Woe be to the man or group of men that seeks to stand in our way in this day of high resolution when every principle we hold dearest is to be vindicated and made secure for the salvation of the nations.
Page 133 - Such divisions among us would be fatal to our peace of mind and might seriously stand in the way of the proper performance of our duty as the one great nation at peace, the one people holding itself ready to play a part of impartial mediation and speak the counsels of peace and accommodation, not as a partisan, but as a friend.
Page 85 - This is not a day of triumph; it is a day of dedication. Here muster not the forces of party but the forces of humanity.
Page 237 - ... a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.
Page 269 - I have outlined. It is the principle of justice to all peoples and nationalities, and their right to live on equal terms of liberty and safety with one another, whether they be strong or weak.
Page 260 - The method the German Chancellor proposes is the method of the Congress of Vienna. We cannot and will not return to that. What is at stake now is the peace of the world. What we are striving for is a new international order based upon broad and universal principles of right and justice — no mere peace of shreds and patches.
Page 224 - I have read many biographies of Lincoln ; I have sought out with the greatest interest the many intimate stories that are told of him, the narratives of nearby friends, the sketches at close quarters, in which those who had the privilege of being associated with him have tried to depict for us the very man himself "in his habit as he lived"; but I have nowhere found a real intimate of Lincoln's.

Bibliographic information