The Cornell Era, Volume 39

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 306 - State which may take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the...
Page 453 - It will be the duty of the Commission to promote and extend and, as they find occasion, to improve the system of education already inaugurated by the military authorities. In doing this they should regard as of first importance the extension of a system of primary education which shall be free to all, and which shall tend to fit the people for the duties of citizenship and for the ordinary avocations of a civilized community.
Page 399 - Teach me to feel another's woe, To hide the fault I see; That mercy I to others show, That mercy show to me.
Page 369 - The leading objecl of the corporation hereby created shall be to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, including military tactics ; in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life.
Page 251 - The temporary absence of worldly scenes and employments produces a state of mind peculiarly fitted to receive new and vivid impressions. The vast space of waters that separates the hemispheres is like a blank page in existence. There is no gradual transition, by which, as in Europe, the features and population of one country blend almost imperceptibly with those of another. From the moment you lose sight of the land you have left all is vacancy until you step on the opposite shore, and are launched...
Page 277 - Little remains : but every hour is saved From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
Page 53 - I shall accept the nomination without pledge, other than to do my duty according to my conscience. If elected, it will be my ambition to give the state a sane, efficient and honorable administration, free from taint of bossism or of servitude to any private interest.
Page 74 - The chief glory of a university is the leadership of the nation in the things that attach to the highest ambitions that nations can set themselves, those ideals which lift nations into the atmosphere of things that are permanent and do not fade from generation to generation. (Applause.) I do not see how any man can fail to perceive that scholarship, that education, in a country like ours, is a branch of statesmanship.
Page 374 - I desire that this shall prove to be the beginning of an institution which shall furnish better means for the culture of all men of every calling, of every aim ; which shall make men more truthful, more honest, more virtuous, more noble, more manly ; which shall give them higher purposes and more lofty aims, qualifying them to serve their fellow-men better, preparing them to serve society better, training them to be more useful in their relations to the state and to better comprehend their higher...
Page 19 - I hope we have laid the foundation of an institution which shall combine practical with liberal education, which shall fit the youth of our country for the professions, the farms, the mines, the manufactories, for the investigations of science, and for mastering all the practical questions of life with success and honor.

Bibliographic information