Practical remarks on infant education, by dr. and miss [E.] Mayo

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - He shall not contend, nor cry out, neither shall any man hear his voice in the streets. The bruised reed he shall not break, and smoking flax he shall not extinguish, till he send forth judgment unto victory.
Page 92 - As it is usually managed, it is a dreadful task indeed to learn, and if possible a more dreadful task to teach to read : with the help of counters, and coaxing, and gingerbread, or by dint of reiterated pain and terror, the names of the...
Page 62 - At length she guides him to the first step in crime, by complaining of want of money, perhaps threatening to apply to his parents, and suggesting that he may easily repay her by taking some trifling article from his master's shop. The first robbery committed, the chances are a thousand to one that the thief will sooner or later be transported or hanged. He goes on robbing his master or perhaps his parents : the woman disposes of the stolen property, giving him only a moderate share of the money obtained...
Page 49 - It is very important also to accustom them to consider their right position in society, and their consequent duties. Teach them that the different grades of rank are established by the Lord, and that each has its appointed . work, as each member of our body has its peculiar office. By leading them to look to God as the disposer of their lot, and to themselves as unworthy recipients of his mercies, you will promote a spirit of cheerfulness and contentment, and a desire of rendering to all their due.
Page 105 - ... of that exercise, is the requisition of exercising each faculty upon the objects which nature points out as related to it. Muscular strength is to be gained by familiarising the muscles with the resistance of external forces, and by the habit of conquering mechanical difficulties, varied to exercise all the muscles, which amount to several hundreds in the human frame. The senses are improved by long and particular training, applying each to its object : — sight, by habitual looking at distant...
Page 62 - Once in debt, he continues to indulge himself without restraint, and is soon involved far beyond his means of repayment. Where is the Police to save him? No act of robbery has been committed, and the Police therefore is absent. Probably his parents or master have impressed on him that it is wrong to run in debt. He is already criminal in his own eyes. Instead of confessing his difficulty to his friends, he thinks of them with fear. All his sensations are watched by the wretch, who now begins to talk...
Page 27 - ... look, to those everlasting hills from whence cometh his help. With prayer must he gird himself for his work, in the spirit of prayer must he carry it on, in the incense of prayer must the offering of his day's exertion ascend before the throne. He must be a man mighty in the Scriptures, line must be upon line...

Bibliographic information