Déliberations Et Mémoires de la Société Royale Du Canada

Front Cover
Royal Society of Canada., 1889 - Humanities
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 24 - Be this as it may, the fact is indisputable and is eminently noteworthy that, while the affinities of the Basque roots have never been conclusively elucidated, there has never been any doubt that this isolated language, preserving its identity in a western corner of Europe between two mighty kingdoms, resembles in its grammatical structure the aboriginal languages of the vast opposite continent, and those alone.
Page 34 - Philologists are well aware that there is nothing in the language of the American Indians to favor the conjecture (for it is nothing else), which derives the race from eastern Asia. But in western Europe one community is known to exist, speaking a language which in its general structure manifests a near likeness to the Indian tongues. Alone of all the races of the old continent the Basques or Euskarians of northern Spain and southwestern France have a speech of that highly complex and polysynthetic...
Page 34 - ... is nothing in the language of the American Indians to favor the conjecture (for it is nothing else), which derives the race from eastern Asia. But in western Europe one community is known to exist, speaking a language which in its general structure manifests a near likeness to the Indian tongues. Alone of all the races of the old continent the Basques or Euskarians of northern Spain and southwestern France have a speech of that highly complex and polysynthetic character which distinguishes the...
Page 45 - ... E-bes-qua-mo'gan, or game of ball, seems to have been the most popular and universal of the outdoor games, and played by all North American tribes. Their legends are more or less Indebted to it. Tradition gives It a prominent place In their wonderful mythology- The Aurora Borealis Is supposed to be Wa-ba-banal playing ball. Among the Wabanaki it was played by women as well as men...
Page 46 - Each held a stick called e-bes-qua-mo'gan-a-tok. This was made of some flexible wood, about 3 feet in length, crooked to three-fourths of a circle at one end, which was interwoven with stripes of hide after the manner of snowshoes. One man was detached to stand in the centre and on his throwing into the air a chip, upon which he had spat, each one would cry, " I'll take the dry" or " I'll take the wet," thus forming opposite factions.
Page 37 - Woody trunks with concentric rings of growth and medullary rays. Cells of pleurenchyma not in regular series, thick-walled and cylindrical, with a double series of spiral fibres and traces of disks.
Page 75 - Pigiguit alone and sent by water to other places; and what at other forts is yet a secret, all unaccounted for to the amount of a very large sum ; and he and his Commissary are now under great perplexity, and contriving to cover this iniquitous fraud. That £30,000 has been laid out on batteries not worth thirty pence for the defence of this place in the judgment of every person acquainted therewith.
Page 24 - European population, dispossessed by the intrusive Indo-European tribes. It stands entirely alone, no kindred having yet been found for it in any part of the world. It is of an exaggeratedly agglutinative type, incorporating into its verb a variety of relations which are almost everywhere else expressed by independent words.
Page 13 - Memoires sur le Canada depuis 1749 jusqu'a 1760, is full of curious matter concerning Bigot and his associates which squares well with other evidence. This is the source from which Smith, in his History of Canada (Quebec, 1815), drew most of his information on the subject. A manuscript which seems to be the original draft of this valuable document...
Page 55 - Garrisor, & having by Ploclamation discharged their harbouring or resetting any of the natives, with whom they used to have a considerable Trade for Peltry, hath so discouraged them from staying that they had built abundance of small vessells to carry themselves and effects to Cape Britton, which was what the French officers so much solicited and threatne'd to do.

Bibliographic information