An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866

Front Cover
LSU Press, Oct 1, 2004 - History - 192 pages
In the summer of 1866, racial tensions ran high in Louisiana as a constitutional convention considered disenfranchising former Confederates and enfranchising blacks. On July 30, a procession of black suffrage supporters pushed through an angry throng of hostile whites. Words were exchanged, shots rang out, and within minutes a riot erupted with unrestrained fury. When it was over, at least forty-eight men—an overwhelming majority of them black—lay dead and more than two hundred had been wounded. In An Absolute Massacre, James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., examines the events surrounding the confrontation and offers a compelling look at the racial tinderbox that was the post-Civil War South.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Chrisdier - LibraryThing

This book is an incredible account of a dark time yet pivotal time in our history. 1866, a group of black suffrage supporters were protesting their way to the Louisiana constitutional convention ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
No Better Constitution
19
There Is No Middle Ground
28
We Are in Revolutionary Times
43
Tomorrow Will Be the Bloodiest Day
69
You Better Stay Home
87
Go Away You Black Son of a Bitch
97
For Gods Sake Dont Shoot Us
107
Hurrah for Hell
117
Go Home?
126
The Rebels Have Control Here
138
Postscript
151
Bibliography
157
Index
165
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2004)

James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., was the author of The Louisiana Native Guards: The Black Military Experience during the Civil War and Pretense of Glory: The Life of Nathaniel P. Banks.

Bibliographic information