The Gentle Legions: National Voluntary Health Organizations in America

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1992 - Social Science - 335 pages

National voluntary health organizations are popularly viewed as charities and are not inclined to debate this designation since this accounts for much of their success. But as Richard Carter brilliantly demonstrates, the combination of health and charity also provides thebasisfor difficulties. Most Americans have a high opinion of health maintenance and a lesser opinion of charity. They are unlikely to be comfortable linking one with the other.

"The Gentle Legions "is a candid and illuminating analysis of the big, voluntary health organizations that have dominated in the second half of the century. Since the original publication of this book thirty years ago, some new groups have arisen and some old ones have collapsed. What has remained constant is a high participation of volunteers to such causes. Carter discusses how big philanthropies function, their goals in the fund-raising campaigns, and the projects that have resulted in both miraculous discoveries and disastrous failures.

A new introduction brings Carter's story up to date, and provides background for a work that remains unsurpassed in clarity of expression and intellectual scope. The "Gentle Legions "is a thought-provoking study of the sociology, economics, and ethics of modern medical charity.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

INTRODUCTION Three Women One Nuisance
15
A Touch of the Past
25
The Controversial Red Cross
38
The Seal of Good Health
63
The Polio Triumph
91
The Cancer Crusade
139
The Heart Fund
173
Seniors Juniors and RunnersUp
189
The Firing Line
217
The Big Sell
246
APPENDIX A NATIONAL VOLUNTARY HEALTH AGENCIES
313
APPENDIX B MEDICAL ADVISERS
316
APPENDIX C OTHER READING
323
APPENDIX D ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
326
Index
327
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - Then, again, do not tell me, as a good man did to-day, of my obligation to put all poor men in good situations. Are they my poor ? I tell thee, thou foolish philanthropist, that I grudge the dollar, the dime, the cent I give to such men as do not belong to me and to whom I do not belong.
Page 29 - There is no buying and selling of any sort in the things of God. Though we have our treasure-chest, it is not made up of purchase-money, as of a religion that has its price.

References to this book

Bibliographic information