Page images
PDF
EPUB

on which he is employed, is utilized as an integral part of his supervised course of instruction.

Contracts have also been negotiated with the Office of Indian Affairs for training at the Pima Indian Agency, Cherokee Indian Agency, and the Uintah Indian School.

In addition to the above, the Veterans Administration reimbursed 44 States, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii under contracts negotiated pursuant to authority contained in Public Law 679, Seventyninth Congress, for expenses incurred by them in connection with the inspection, approval, and supervision of on-the-job-training establishments under Public Law 346. Pursuant to authority contained in Public Law 610, the Veterans Administration has reimbursed 35 States and Puerto Rico under contracts for expenses incurred in connection with the inspection, approval, and supervision of profit schools training veterans under Public Law 346.

COUNSELING AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE The Veterans Administration continued to provide counseling services to veterans through individual interviews and the application of approved techniques in vocational guidance and applied psychology. Priority was given to disabled veteran-applicants for vocational rehabilitation under Public Law 16, but counseling services were also provided under Public Law 346 to veterans who requested educational or vocational guidance and to veterans for whom such services were required in connection with their requests for a change of course. The purpose of the counseling services was to assist veterans in exploring their interests, aptitudes, and abilities, in determining what occupations may be most suitable for them, and in choosing courses of education or training to prepare them for employment in such occupations.

Although the policy of the Veterans Administration to provide guidance services at decentralized locations near veterans' homes remained unchanged, the gradual decline in the number of veterans requiring counseling services made it necessary to reduce from 444 in July 1950, to 313 in June 1951, the number of locations at which such services were provided.

Counseling services were provided to 204,000 veterans during the 1950–51 school year, as compared to 431,000 in 1949–50, and 392,000 in 1948–49. These were all veterans of World War II, except 41 veterans who became eligible for benefits by reason of Public Law 894, approved December 28, 1950, making eligible primarily those whose disabilities were related to the Korean conflict. Of the 82,000 disabled veterans who were counseled under Public Law 16, more than 66 percent were provided counseling services by Veterans Administration personnel, mostly at regional offices, and almost 34 percent at guidance centers. Of the 122,000 veterans counseled under Public Law 346, the services were provided by Veterans Administration personnel in 25 percent of the cases, and 75 percent were counseled at guidance centers.

NUMBERS IN TRAINING Figures pertaining to the education of veterans are now available for eight school years. The largest number of veterans taking training during the 1950–51 school year was reached on November 30, 1950, when 1,870,000 veterans were enrolled. This was 66.7 percent of the all-time high of 2,802,000 veterans reported at the end of December 1947.

The number of veterans associated with various levels and programs of education is discussed in the annual reports of the Administration of Veterans Affairs. These reports show that about 50 percent of the veterans have been taking courses under the combined programs of Public Law 16 and Public Law 346. Table 41 indicates the type of training pursued by the veterans over the past 6 years. The data reveal that higher education accounted for 41 percent of the veterans in training over the past 5 years. Similarly, 29 percent were enrolled in courses below college grade, 19 percent were in on-job training courses and 11 percent were taking training on the farm. All figures have been supplied by the Veterans Administration.

On January 2, 1951, when President Truman delivered his Budget Message to the Congress he offered the following comment regarding the veterans' education program:

Expenditures for education and training of World War II veterans are estimated at 626 million dollars in the fiscal year 1953, a decline of 860 million dollars from the revised estimates for the current fiscal year. The 1953 expenditures will provide for an average enrollment of 491,000 in school, job, and farm training courses. The reduction from an average enrollment of over one million in the current fiscal year reflects the fact that July 25, 1951, was the deadline for initiation of training under the program. By the end of the fiscal year 1953, approximately 7,800,000 veterans about half of all the veterans of World War II—will have received education and training at a cost to the Government of 14.3 billion dollars. This investment is already proving to be of great benefit to the veterans and the Nation.

SUBSISTENCE AND EDUCATION A summary of figures pertaining to the education and training programs of the Veterans Administration for the entire period these services have been provided, is given in table 42. Allowances for subsistence, together with figures showing the amounts expended for education, are given. The figures indicate that the subsistence allowances constitute the major portion of the total cost. Under Public Law 16, an average of 79.9 percent has been expended for subsistence of veterans and their families, while under Public Law 346, 70.1 percent is for subsistence. The remaining portions are for tuition, equipment, supplies, and materials. Table 43 provides detailed figures pertaining to the veterans education program, State by State, for the 1950–51 school year.

Table 41.-AVERAGE NUMBER OF VETERANS ENROLLED IN VARIOUS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OFFERED BY THE VETERANS ADMINISTRA. TION IN THE 5 MONTHS FROM OCTOBER THROUGH MARCH, 1945-46 TO 1950–51

[blocks in formation]

Table 42.-NUMBER OF VETERANS IN TRAINING AND EXPENDITURES FOR

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING, 1943–44 TO 1950–51

[blocks in formation]

Percent.
Total...

29.9
$3,655,768,861

70.1 $8,563,407,182

1943-44 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47

922 9, 464 44,578 174, 465 237,382 217, 740 167,809 99,872

20.1

79.9
$279,893,403 $1,112,830,145
97,480
566, 668

0
1,302, 027 7,046, 348 11,956
7,093, 906 37,993, 447 376, 750
30, 005, 602 190, 941, 044 1,883, 551
68,013, 236 265, 298, 234 2,213, 382
73, 002, 526 262, 196, 010 2,054, 616
58, 676,346 213,615,520 1,990, 413
41, 702, 280 135, 172, 874 1,552, 040

0 1,702,821 32, 113, 444 567,938, 944 872,756, 131 834, 379, 091 766, 616, 410 580, 262, 020

0 7,802, 860 317, 905, 345 1,550, 796, 114 1,628, 907,830 1,865, 804, 493 1,829, 111,963 1,363,078, 577

1947-48 1948-49 1949-50 1950-51

Table 43.-EXPENDITURES FOR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND FOR

EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF WORLD WAR II VETERANS, FOR THE 1950-51 SCHOOL YEAR

[blocks in formation]

Percent Total..

99,872

Alabama... Arizona.. Arkansas California. Colorado

3,048

547 2,854 5, 442 1,474

933

80 1,926 3,924

744

947,4

Connecticut.
Delaware
Florida
Georgia..
Idaho..
Illinois.
Indians
Iowa.
Kansas,
Kentucky.
Louisiana..
Maine...
Maryland
Massachusetts...
Michigan..
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri..
Montana
Nebraska.
Nevada.
New Hampshire.
New Jersey.
New Mexico
New York.

2,348 1, 769 1,397 1, 257 3, 539 2,077

222

538 3,088 3,141

2,616 3,247 3, 740

424 1,115

23.6

76.4 $41,702,280 $135,172,874 1,131, 620 4,072, 733 243,892

730, 915
981, 353 4,045, 397
2,877,370 7, 382, 659

730, 750 1,990,031
326,412 1,295, 164

25, 902 110,009
1,096, 841 2,603, 203
1, 151, 656 5,382, 346

220,074 1,015,816
1,583,874 3, 303,021

683, 150 2, 249, 056
540, 807

1,836, 086
380,452 894, 642
426

4,887,883 853,552 2,818, 126 71, 156

281, 329 189, 894 513, 896 1,464, 350 4,239, 522 1,438, 677 3,953, 032

789, 739 2,955,539 1,015, 439 4,534, 223 1,479,060

5,335, 288 159,800

550, 005 379, 738 1,457, 143

15,609 51,402 123, 841 338, 963 610, 152 2, 200, 375

224, 434 604, 889 3,966, 329 8, 225, 363

586,681 2,743,897

294,046 1, 283, 181 1,558, 364

6, 472,511 1, 194, 802 4,341, 672

397, 548 900, 654
2,954, 941 8,495,079

196, 885 810, 279
559, 616 2,639, 640

73, 576 305, 030
1,304, 703 5, 492, 497
3,886, 742

11, 108, 165 256, 613

608, 187 81,309 284, 961 353, 306 1,685,342 575, 894

1,585, 716 326,493 1,798,449 693, 883 2,737, 311 68,955 283, 964

37 243 1,760

430 6,171

1,914

559 4,948 3, 167

687

North Carolina.. North Dakota. Ohio Oklahoma. Oregon.... Pennsylvania.. Rhode Island South Carolina. South Dakota Tennessee

6,301

441 1,980

220 3,881 7,916

430

211 1,277 1,185

Texas. Utah. Vermont. Virginia. Washington.... West Virginia... Wisconsin Wyoming District of

Columbia. Foreign countries U.S. Possessions.

1,379 2, 039

208

533

514, 101

1,051, 951

29.9

70.1 1,552,040 $580,262,020 $1,363,078,577

48, 898 14,355,818 53, 249, 401 6,507 2,645, 324 5,848, 968 33, 044 9, 169, 577 33, 145, 886 90, 245 35, 963, 415 68,502, 505 17,334 7,875, 863 16, 187, 666 13,899 4,359,718 8,456, 660

2, 210 581,442 1,329,935 33, 318 13,601, 432 32, 825, 711 55, 455 12, 293, 009 52,347,570

6,930 2,809, 493 6,109, 475 67,556 32, 495, 231 51,394,434 32, 702 11, 339, 665 23, 732, 836 19, 123 7,761, 353 17,853, 528 13, 355 3,882, 338 10, 209, 761 25, 726 7,512, 991 26, 445, 601 48,923 21,075, 756 59, 408, 044 5,579 1,444, 297 3,901, 052 23, 868 8,667,846 16,627, 424 35,566 16, 708,649 24,987, 181 41,533 15,858, 501 26,038, 266 27,190 8,928,845 21,085,061 41,338 11, 754, 962 47, 367, 393 43,840 18,884, 877 44,356, 049

6, 145 2,317, 451 5, 267, 212 13,993 4, 290, 031 13,651, 105 974

306, 453 605, 976 3,443 1,312, 119 2,533,706 41,384 16, 072,571 25, 686,858

7,793 3,037, 454 7,716, 186 140, 218 64,609,583 91,573, 610 51,323 13, 178, 948 54, 295, 972 4,300 2, 158, 635 6,668, 101 62,806 21, 139,502 42, 252, 920 27, 210 9, 203, 947 25,980, 429 11,837 5,802, 874 9,891, 491 127, 367 50, 110, 742 105, 316,844 5,882 2,851, 361 5, 256, 220 33,565 8, 777, 708 35, 298, 116 5, 925

1,811, 797 6,093, 064 49, 241 19, 108, 186 56,787,574 93,213 36,541, 301 94,830,079 9, 342 4, 192, 930 8, 640, 678 2,771 977, 137 2, 265, 423 20,982 6,456, 112 18,593,856 17, 246 7, 178,599 14,025, 1 14,074 3,490, 238 11,001, 266 22, 202 8, 220, 298 17,703,513 3, 203 1,049, 298 2,861, 323

50 415

13,984 106, 489

85, 976 600, 356

15,091
10, 930
15, 441

9,425,573
2,692, 329
3,978, 441

15,540, 424
12, 975, 621
18, 355, 455

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF OTHER

FEDERAL OFFICES

[ocr errors]

ANY FEDERAL OFFICES in addition to the Federal
Security Agency, the Department of Agriculture, Depart-

ment of the Interior, and the Veterans Administration presented in preceding chapters, have educational interests and expend funds for educational programs. These activities vary from small amounts used for in-service training of employees to large appropriations used in providing educational services for thousands of students. Programs serve children in schools for regular and for specialized instruction, adults who are seeking to improve their occupational status, and people of other countries who participate in educational programs for the improvement of world relationships. A comprehensive view of the Federal expenditures for education was given in tables 1 and 2 of Chapter I.

In this chapter are presented descriptions and data pertaining to Federal funds for educational purposes administered by 8 agencies of the Federal Government. Amounts for education by these offices are difficult to separate from other parts of their budgets. Consequently, the figures are incomplete and in some instances have not been given.

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION In table 2 it was apparent that the Atomic Energy Commission expends significant amounts of money for contract research. Contracts are arranged with individual universities, with groups of universities and with industrial establishments for research and also for research training or fellowship programs. The Commission's Divisions of Research and of Biology and Medicine are responsible for the development and supervision of research in the physical, biological, and medical sciences Atomic Energy Commission installations and outside organizations.

CONTRACT RESEARCH

The Atomic Energy Commission contracts for unclassified research in the physical sciences in university and college laboratories, currently at an annual rate of about 11.5 million dollars, and in the biological and medical sciences currently at an annual rate of about 5.8 million dollars. These contracts are generally for

« PreviousContinue »