Page images
PDF
EPUB

90 percent continuing to go to the educational institutions and 10 percent to health institutions.

More recently, the Agency has been engaged in cooperating with the Department of Defense and the National Production Authority in the recovery of personal property, including machine tools and production equipment formerly transferred to educational institutions. The recapture is in accordance with agreements made with the institutions at the time of transfer.

Figures pertaining to the donation of surplus personal property in 5 recent years are given in table 16. Detailed allocations for the 1949–50 school year are shown in table 17, and similar figures for 1950–51 are included in column 10 of the summary table 3. All of these data have been supplied by the Surplus Property Utilization Division of the Federal Security Agency.

Table 16.-ACQUISITION VALUE OF DONABLE PERSONAL PROPERTY AL

LOTTED TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, 1946–47 TO 1950–51

[blocks in formation]

Table 17.-ACQUISITION VALUES AND ALLOCATIONS OF DONABLE

PERSONAL PROPERTY MADE AVAILABLE TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITU. TIONS, FOR THE 1949-50 SCHOOL YEAR

[blocks in formation]

Total..-

$110,306,652

Louisiana..
Maine.
Maryland.
Massachusetts.

Oregon.
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina.

Alabama
Arizona.
Arkansas.
California
Colorado.

Michigan..
Minnesota
Mississippi.
Missouri.
Montana.

South Dakota.
Tennessee.
Texas.
Utah.
Vermont.

1,617,703
1, 258, 614
1,344, 174
15,487, 240

796, 380
679,959

471, 041
2,676, 384
1,724, 417
3,933, 997
3,285,448
4, 190, 077
1, 177, 611

789, 480 2,124, 302

Connecticut.
Delaware
Florida.
Georgia
Idaho.
Illinois.
Indiana.
Iowa.
Kansas
Kentucky.

Nebraska.
Nevada.
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico.

$1,487,364

414,960 4,414,575 2,166, 251 2,543, 389 2,434,909 2,053, 210 2,395, 977 1,069, 390

191, 501 285, 190

217,298 1,450, 854

724, 647 4,934, 720 1, 749,883

236, 231
5,951, 427
2, 295,579

Virginia.
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin.
Wyoming
District of Columbia

$2,805,948
3,835, 859

451, 928 1,559, 931

240, 791 1,884, 257 3,568, 202 1,346, 269

157,990 3,260,869 5,753, 748 1,850, 587 2, 297, 195

315,368
927,348
356, 323
841, 069
278, 788

New York.
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio..
Oklahoma.

Alaska.
Hawaii
Puerto Rico.

SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY

Similarly, another section of Public Law 152, Eighty-first Congress, approved in 1949 authorizes the sale or lease of real property to educational institutions if an important use can be shown. Such property may vary from single buildings or small parcels of land with or without improvements to large installations complete with buildings and all utilities. Occasionally, in addition to buildings, sewage disposal plants, electrical or water distribution systems, fencing, bleachers, heating plants, and other improvements may be purchased for removal from the site and for educational use.

Benefits which have accrued to the Government or which may accrue in the future are recognized in the determination of payments to be made for surplus real property. Such benefits, expressed as a percent of the fair value of the property, are termed, "public benefit allowances” and, when granted are amortized by educational institutions over a period of from 5 to 20 years.

In addition to disposing of surplus real property for school, classroom, or other educational purposes, the Surplus Property Utilization Division is responsible for the periodic approval of the program of utilization of transferred property; for the retransfer of property to other educational claimants; for authorizing other disposals by a transferee; and for changing the terms, conditions, and limitations in a transfer instrument when conditions warrant.

In recent months, and in cooperation with the Department of Defense, the Office has recaptured real property having an original acquisition cost in excess of $100,000,000. This is in accordance with agreements arranged with the educational institutions at the time of transfer. Such repossessed real property is for emergency use by the Department of Defense and possession will be returned to the educational institutions when the emergency is passed unless circumstances require that title also be taken by the Federal Government.

The total amount expended by the Federal Government in acquiring properties, which were later transferred to educational institutions through December 31, 1951, was $536,143,798. Fair values at the time of transfer were considered to be $104,184,189. Both of these figures are given in table 18. Detailed figures showing the amounts of real property transferred to educational institutions, State by State, are given in tables 19 and 20. All of the data reported here have been obtained from the Surplus Property Utilization Division of the Federal Security Agency.

Table 18.-FEDERAL SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY TRANSFERRED TO ALL EDU.

CATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, 1946–47 TO DECEMBER 31, 1951

[blocks in formation]

Table 19,-ACQUISITION COST AND FAIR VALUE OF FEDERAL SURPLUS

REAL PROPERTY ALLOTTED, FOR THE 1950-51 SCHOOL YEAR

[blocks in formation]

Table 20.-ACQUISITION COST AND FAIR VALUE OF FEDERAL SURPLUS

REAL PROPERTY ALLOTTED, FROM JULY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1951

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION Federal funds, for the purpose of cooperating with the several States in the vocational rehabilitation of disabled persons and their return to civil employment, were provided for the first time under a law enacted in 1920. That law provided annual appropriations for 4 years. Similar laws of 1924, 1930, 1932, and 1935 continued the program. Under these laws the Federal appropriation was allotted among the States on the basis of population. In order to receive its share of the Federal funds each State was required to appropriate at least an equal amount of State money for this purpose.

The States actually operate the programs of vocational rehabilitation, while the Federal office establishes standards for operation, gives technical and consultative service, and certifies Federal grants for the State operations according to the distribution formula provided in the public law.

With the passage of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1943, known as the Barden-LaFollette Act, not only was

[ocr errors]

the scope of the program expanded, but the method of financing was changed. The 1943 amendments required the Federal Security Administrator to reimburse the States for necessary expenditures in accordance with the approved "State plan" in the following proportions: 100 percent of the cost of services for war-disabled civilians; 100 percent of the costs of administration, guidance, and placement; and 50 percent of the cost of the other services enumerated in the Act. These other services are: Medical examinations, surgical and therapeutic treatments, hospitalization not exceeding 90 days, prosthetic appliances, transportation, occupational tools and licenses, vocational training, and maintenance. Medical and psychiatric examinations to determine eligibility for service and vocational guidance, training, and placement are available at no cost to the disabled. Medical treatment, transportation, maintenance, occupational tools, equipment, and training supplies are provided without cost where economic need of the individual has been established.

The 1943 enactment now in operation provides that, to be approvable, a State plan for vocational rehabilitation shall designate the State Board for Vocational Education as the sole agency for the administration, supervision, and control of the State plan, except where a State law authorizes some other agency to provide rehabilitation services for the adult blind. In such States the plan shall provide that the same agency shall administer that part of the State plan relating to the blind. In 36 States vocational rehabilitation for the blind is administered through such agencies for the blind.

Amounts made available to the States and Territories to assist them with the expense of operating the programs of vocational rehabilitation for the past 10 years are presented in table 21. Detailed figures showing the amounts by States and Territories for the 1950–51 school year are listed in column 5 of table 3. Stateby-State allotments for the 1951-52 school year are shown in table 22. Other details on amounts for each of the various purposes and on distribution dates may be obtained from the Federal Security Agency, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Table 21.- FEDERAL FUNDS ALLOTTED FOR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION,

1942-43 TO 1951-52

[blocks in formation]

Total (10 years) $137,647,971.46 1942-43.

2,761, 748.00 1943-44.

4,051,551.00

1944-45... $7,135,441.00
1945-46. 10,003, 074.00
1946-47 14, 188, 933.00
1947-48... 17, 706,843.00

1948-49.. $18, 697,993.46
1949-50. 20,500,000.00
1950-51. 21, 102, 388.00
1951-52... 121,500,000.00

1 Estimated yb Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

« PreviousContinue »