Sovereign Immunity: Hearing Before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session : Oversight Hearing to Provide for Indian Legal Reform, Part 1

Front Cover
"March 11, 1998, Washington, DC"--Pt. 1.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 312 - But in view of the Constitution, in the eye of the law, there is in this country no superior, dominant, ruling class of citizens. There is no caste here. Our Constitution is color-blind and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens.
Page 157 - Their relation to the United States resembles that of a ward to his guardian. They look to our Government for protection : rely upon its kindness and its power ; appeal to it for relief to their wants ; and address the President as their great father.
Page 206 - It is unlawful for any national bank, or any corporation organized by authority of any law of Congress, to make a contribution or expenditure in connection with any election to any political office...
Page 576 - No treaty for the cession of any portion or part of the reservation herein described which may be held in common shall be of any validity or force as against the said Indians, unless executed and signed by at least three fourths of all the adult male Indians, occupying or interested in the same...
Page 244 - It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led the young men is dead. It is cold and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food; no one knows where they are — perhaps freezing to death.
Page 576 - The Indian nations had always been considered as distinct, independent political communities, retaining their original natural rights, as the undisputed possessors of the soil from time immemorial, with the single exception of that imposed by irresistible power, which excluded them from intercourse with any other European potentate than the first discoverer of the coast of the particular region claimed...
Page 479 - The utmost good faith shall always be observed towards the Indians; their lands and property shall never be taken from them without their consent...
Page 158 - If it be true that the Cherokee Nation have rights, this is not the tribunal in which those rights are to be asserted. If it be true that wrongs have been inflicted, and that still greater are to be apprehended, this is not the tribunal which can redress the past or prevent the future.
Page 245 - Let me be a free man— free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose, free to choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to think and talk and act for myself— and I will obey every law, or submit to the penalty.
Page 245 - Whenever the white man treats the Indian as they treat each other, then we shall have no more wars. We shall be all alike, brothers of one father and one mother, with one sky above us and one country around us, and one government for all. Then the Great Spirit Chief who rules above will smile upon this land, and send rain to wash out the bloody spots made by brothers' hands upon the face of the earth.

Bibliographic information