History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Reign of Victoria

Front Cover
D.Appleton and Company, 1875
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 326 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 264 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too ; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm ; to...
Page 151 - We will not be the dregs of all : seeing other nations have the law of God, which is the law of our faith, written in their own language.
Page 294 - I came one morning into the House well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and' not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side, his countenance swollen and reddish, his...
Page 321 - My God ! what a wretch am I ! among so many thousand bullets, is there not one to put an end to my miserable life...
Page 32 - I shall to another world, and thou shalt be left alone in all my wealth. I pray thee (for thou art my dear child), strive to be a father and a lord to thy people. Be thou the children's father, and the widow's friend. Comfort thou the poor, and shelter the weak ; and with all thy might, right that which is wrong. And, Son, govern thyself by law ; then shall the Lord love thee, and God, above all things, shall be thy reward. Call thou upon Him to advise thee in all thy need, and so shall He help thee...
Page 195 - Prince, after an insulting manner, how he dared to invade his dominions. The young Prince, more mindful of his high birth than of his present fortune, replied that he came thither to claim his just inheritance. The ungenerous Edward, insensible to pity, struck him on the face with his gauntlet; and the Dukes of Clarence and Gloucester, Lord Hastings, and Sir Thomas Gray, taking the blow as a signal for further violence, hurried the Prince into the next apartment and there despatched him with their...
Page 168 - ... October 24th they arrived near the village of Azincourt, where they beheld the whole French army drawn up at some distance before them. Henry took an attentive survey of the country from a rising ground, and saw that it was equally impossible to retreat or to advance without a, battle. He therefore resolved to hazard one the next morning, and sent his faithful Welsh squire, David Gam, to reconnoitre the number of the French army. Gam's blunt account was that "there were enough to fight, enough...
Page 194 - Tewkesbury, on the 3d of May. The queen and the young prince were soon after taken prisoners, and thus an end was put to the bloody contest between these two rival families, a contest which had lasted eighteen ye,ars, and had cost the lives of sixty princes of the royal family^ above one half of the nobles and principal gentry of the kingdom, and 100,000 of the common people. After the battle of Tewkesbury, the young prince Edward was brought into the king's presence, who asked him how he dared to...
Page 102 - These, for instance : that the goods of every free man shall be disposed of, after his death, according to his will : that, if he die without making a will, his children shall succeed to his property : that no officer of the crown shall take horses, carts, or wood, without the consent of the owner : that no free man shall be imprisoned, outlawed, or banished, unless by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land : that even a rustic shall not by any fine be bereaved of his -carts, ploughs,...

Bibliographic information