Page images
PDF
EPUB

"OLD TIMES."

A magazine devoted to the publication of documents, &c., rela-
tive to the early history of North Yarmouth, Maine, and its in-
habitants. Published quarterly, at Yarmouth, Maine, (provided
my duties in the public service will permit.) Price 30 cents a
copy. No yearly subscriptions received.

Contributions of material suitable for such a work, are respect-
fully solicited, for which due credit will be given. Articles for
publication can be delivered to Robert E. Corliss, Corner Village,
Yarmouth, Maine, or mailed to the subscriber, post-office box 261,
same town.

Copies of the magazine can be obtained of the following-named

persons, viz:-

:-

CONTENTS.

[ocr errors]

871

A MAGAZINE

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION AND PUBLICATION OF DOC.
UMENTS RELATING TO THE EARLY HISTORY

-OF

NORTH YARMOUTH, MAINE.

INCLUDING, AS FAR AS

POSSIBLE, ANY INCIDENTS WORTHY OF RECORD

RELATIVE TO THE TOWNS OF

HARPSWELL, FREEFORT. POWNAL, CUMBERLAND

AND YARMOUTH.

ALL OFESHOOTS OF THE OLD TOWN.

ALSO

GENEALOGICAL RECORDS OF THE PRINCIPAL FAMILIES AND BIOGRAPHI. CAL SKETCHES OF THE MOST DISTINGUISHED RESI

DENTS OF THE TOWN

VOL. 5. NO.1.

AUGUSTUS W. CORLISS,

YARMOUTH, MAINE.

JAN. 1, 1881.

OLD TIMES

IN

NORTH YARMOUTH, MAINE.

NO. 1.

JAN., 1881.

VOL. 5.

NORTH YARMOUTH.

(By Rev. JOSEPH Stockbridge, U. S. Navy.)

This paper is offered as a supplement to the one prepared by Dr. N. T. TRUE, and printed on pp. 274-82, OLD TIMES.

I ought to say that my memory runs back to 1817. I will follow Dr. True's trail.

The first building on the right, starting at the lower falls bridge. was a one-story store on the site of the present brick store, and kept by Oakes & Mitchell (Nathan Oakes and Daniel Mitchell.) The next building was the two-story house of Capt. John Hale. When the firm of W. R. & C. Stockbridge was dissolved, W. R. Stockbridge took the Oakes & Mitchell store, having Jacob G. Loring as clerk. After Capt. Hale moved to Portland, W. R. Stockbridge purchased his house and altered the first story into a store, and moved the other store into the rear, for the storage of heavy goods.

Beyond Dr. David Jones' house, and very near it, was a onestory house occupied by the doctor's farmer. That house was purchased by Master Pratt, who moved it nearer the street and added a story.

The Maj. Mitchell house was originally a gambrel-roof house, owned by the widow Ames, and stood on the site of the house of W. R. Stockbridge.

David True had many buildings on his premises. South of his house, was a shop in which cloth was finished, he being a clothier as well as farmer. North of his house, was a corn-crib, then the "little barn," then a capacious carriage-house in which he stored

rge barn, to which was attached a

his farming-tools, then a very long shed and fold for his sheep.

The old school-house, in the corner of "Uncle True's " pasture, was the next building. It had a porch in front, with a door facing south. On entering the school-room, a wide chimney confronted you, and, on going around it, you found a big fire-place, and, in winter-time, a roaring fire. A brick hearth extended two-thirds the length of the room, and near the end of it was a brick stove, with an iron top, in which was another fire. On each side of the room were four tiers of desks and seats, one rising above the other; the boys on one side and the girls on the other. In the rear end of the room was an immense desk for the teacher. In those days the boys took turns in building the fire, and the girls in sweeping the house. When school was "half done," and the boys out at play, if a strange carriage came along, the boys would form a line, take off their hats and bow to the stranger. I suppose that "Young America" would now turn up his nose at such a display of rustic manners. In the long-ago days, Miss Elizabeth D. Bailey was the teacher in summer-time, a male teacher being employed in winter. Miss Bailey is still living in Portland.

It was in this school-house that we had our first Sunday school, in June, 1818. The schools were not denominational then; all the children in the district came. I can remember the first lesson the 139th Psalm, and I never read that scripture without peculiar emotions. Opposite the school-house was a mile-stone giving the miles to Boston. The stage-road ran through our district, and a short distance above the school-house was the stable, where the horses were changed, at Capt Larrabee's tavern. Near the stable, and on the corner of the road leading to Brown's Point, was a very large barn, in which, perhaps in 1816, I saw for the first time an elephant.

The next house was that of a master ship-builder, Mitchell. The name of his wife was Martha; and after his death we used to speak of the place as "Aunt Mattie Mitchell's."

We next came to a two-story shop bearing the sign, "N. Oakes, Chair-maker." Mr. Oakes also made window-blinds. The next house was a very small one, and was occupied by the Videto family.

We now come to a house that must be one of the oldest in that part of the town. It has been occupied by a Lovell family. I remember going to a general muster that was held on this farm.

We now return to the bridge, and on the west side find a sawmill on the site of the first one built in the town (about 1674.) Adjoining it was the grist-mill, then run by Jacob Jones. The people living on the islands brought their grists to this mill. On these occasions, the islanders brought fresh fish, which they sold

« PreviousContinue »