The European Magazine, and London Review, Volume 48

Front Cover
Philological Society of London, 1805
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 469 - Durham's exertions have been very great. I hope I shall get them all destroyed by to-morrow, if the weather keeps moderate. In the gale the Royal Sovereign and Mars lost their foremasts, and are now rigging anew, where the body of the Squadron is at anchor to the NW of San Lucar. I find that on the return of Gravina to Cadiz he was immediately ordered to sea again, and came out, which made it necessary for me to form a line, to cover the disabled Hulls : that night it blew hard, and his Ship, the...
Page 393 - Lord Viscount Nelson, who, in the late conflict with the enemy, fell in the hour of victory, leaves to me the duty of informing my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that on the 19th instant, it was communicated to the...
Page 89 - While low delights, succeeding fast behind, In happier meanness occupy the mind: As in those domes, where...
Page 409 - Baron Nelson of the Nile and of Burnham Thorpe, in the County of Norfolk...
Page 157 - Fox' public-house, and drew the immense chain of waggons with apparent ease to near the turnpike at Croydon, a distance of six miles, in one hour and forty-one minutes, which is nearly at the rate of four miles an hour. In the course of...
Page 396 - ... were manageable from getting hold of many of the prizes (thirteen or fourteen), and towing them off to the westward, where I ordered them to rendezvous round the Royal Sovereign, in tow by the Neptune: but on the...
Page 291 - Within this period, almost all the great works in painting, in sculpture, and in architecture, which have been the admiration of future times, were produced. Under the successive but uninterrupted patronage of Julius II. and Leo X., the talents of the great artists then living were united...
Page 467 - I am low-spirited on this account, or fancy any thing is to happen to me ; quite the contrary. My mind is calm, and I have only to think of destroying our inveterate foe. I have two frigates gone for more information, and we all hope for a meeting with the enemy. Nothing can be finer than the fleet under my command. Whatever be the event, believe me ever, my dear Davison, your much obliged and sincere friend, — NELSON AND BRONTE.
Page 84 - I have renewed and honored the holy church of the blessed apostle St. Peter, of Westminster ; and I order and establish for ever, that what person, of what condition or estate soever he be, from...
Page 394 - Commander-in-chief about the tenth ship from the van ; the second in command about the twelfth from the rear, leaving the van of the enemy unoccupied ; the succeeding ships breaking through in all parts, astern of their leaders, and engaging the enemy at the muzzles of their guns.

Bibliographic information