English Mechanic and World of Science: With which are Incorporated "the Mechanic", "Scientific Opinion," and the "British and Foreign Mechanic.", Volume 12

Front Cover
E. J. Kibblewhite, 1871 - Industrial arts
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - But expectation is permissible where belief is not ; and if it were given me to look beyond the abyss of geologically recorded time to the still more remote period when the earth was passing through physical and chemical conditions, which it can no more see again than a man can recall his infancy, I should expect to be a witness of the evolution of living protoplasm from not living matter.
Page 76 - ... any new and original impression, ornament, pattern, print or picture, to be printed, painted, cast or otherwise placed on or worked into any article of manufacture; or any new, useful and original shape or configuration of any article of manufacture, the same not having been known or used by others before his invention or production thereof, or patented, or described in any printed publication, may, upon payment of the duty required by law, and other due proceedings had, the same as in cases...
Page 5 - Sanderson, which is one of the clearest, most comprehensive, and well-reasoned discussions of a great question which has come under my notice for a long time. I refer you to it for details and for the authorities for the statements I am about to make. You are familiar with what happens in vaccination. A minute cut is made in the skin, and an infinitesimal quantity of vaccine matter is inserted into the wound. Within a certain time, a vesicle appears in the place of the wound, and the fluid which...
Page 4 - And looking back through the prodigious vista of the past, I find no record of the commencement of life, and therefore I am devoid of any means of forming a definite conclusion as to the conditions of its appearance. Belief, in the scientific sense of the word, is a serious matter, and needs strong foundations.
Page 4 - Abiogenesis ever has taken place in the past, or ever will take place in the future. With organic chemistry, molecular physics, and physiology, yet in their infancy, and every day making prodigious strides, I think it would be the height of presumption for any man to say that the conditions under which matter assumes the properties we call " vital " may not, some day, be artificially brought together.
Page 6 - And thus mankind will have one more admonition that the " people perish for lack of knowledge" ; and that the alleviation of the miseries and the promotion of the welfare of men must be sought, by those who will not lose their pains, in that diligent, patient, loving study, of all the multitudinous aspects of Nature, the results of which constitute exact knowledge, or Science.
Page 5 - contagious," because a healthy fly coming in contact with a diseased one, from which the spore-bearing filaments protrude, is pretty sure to carry off a spore or two. It is " infectious " because the spores become scattered about all sorts of matter in the neighbourhood of the slain flies.
Page 4 - ... when they have been opened. The first reply that suggests itself is the probability that there must be some error about these experiments, because they are performed on an enormous scale every day with quite contrary results. Meat, fruits, vegetables, the very materials of the most fermentable and putrescible infusions, are preserved to the extent, I suppose I may say, of thousands of tons every year, by a method which is a mere application of Spallanzani's experiment.
Page 4 - French naturalist's hypothesis of " organic molecules," according to which, life is the indefeasible property of certain indestructible molecules of matter, which exist in all living things, and have inherent activities by which they are distinguished from not living matter. Each individual living organism is formed by their temporary combination.
Page 5 - ... worm, the life of which is neither more, nor less, closely bound up with that of the infested organism. If there were a kind of diseased structure, the histological elements of which were capable' of maintaining a separate and independent existence out of the body, it seems to me that the shadowy boundary between morbid growth and Xenogenesis would be effaced. And I am inclined to think that the progress of discovery has almost brought us to this point already. I have been favoured by Mr. Simon...

Bibliographic information