Mind and Hand: The Birth of MIT

Front Cover

The intellectual heritage of MIT: an account of "the flow of ideas" about science and education that shaped the Institute as it emerged and that inspires it today.

The motto on the seal of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "Mens et Manus" -- "mind and hand" -- signals the Institute's dedication to what MIT founder William Barton Rogers called "the most earnest cooperation of intelligent culture with industrial pursuits." Mind and Hand traces the ideas about science and education that have shaped MIT and defined its mission -- from the new science of the Enlightenment era and the ideals of representative democracy spurred by the Industrial Revolution to new theories on the nature and role of higher education in nineteenth-century America. MIT emerged in mid-century as an experiment in scientific and technical education, with its origins in the tension between these old and new ideas.

Mind and Hand was undertaken by Julius Stratton after his retirement from the presidency of MIT and continued by Loretta Mannix after his death; Philip N. Alexander, of the MIT Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies, stepped in to complete the project. The combined efforts of these three authors have given us what Julius Stratton envisioned -- "a coherent account of the flow of ideas" from which MIT emerged.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Foreword
Preface
Prologue
The Antecedents
1
European Origins
3
Migration of a Heritage
19
The Rise of Technical Education in America
29
The Rogers Brothers and the Boston Scene
59
The Society the Museum and the School
331
The Society of Arts
333
The Commitee on Publication
367
The Museum of Technology
381
The School of Industrial Science
403
A Voluminous Enterprise
425
The School Opens
429
The First Faculty
459

A Family Affair
61
Harvard
87
The Lawrence Scientific
109
The Fonding of MIT
135
PreHistoric Annals of the Institute
137
An Auxiliary to the Cause of Education
165
Facts of the Founding
185
The Struggle to Get Under Way
215
Persistent Perseverance
217
The LandGrant Act of 1862
241
Harvard Again
267
The Difficult Question of Money
285
The Building
309
The First Students
487
The Early Curriculum and Methods of Teaching
519
The First Six Courses
521
A Curricular Innovation
547
Methods of Teaching
565
Epilogue
603
2 Society of Arts Communications 18621870
613
Notes
637
Selected Sources
733
Illustrations
749
Index
753
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

George Hill, is Executive Secretary of Doctors Opposing Circumcision and a former airline captain. He has been involved in the issue of the nontherapeutic circumcision of nonconsenting children for more than a decade.

Bibliographic information