Our Country: A Household History of the United States for All Readers, from the Discovery of America to the Present Time, Volume 3

Front Cover
Johnson & Miles, 1877 - History in art - 2040 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Political Struggles in Kansas 1390A State Constitution Adopted 1391Violence in Kansas
1391
The Dred Scott Decision 1397Action of the Supreme Court of the United States 1397Early
1399
President Buchanans Course Foreshadowed 1400Civil War in Kansas and Civil Government
1406
CHAPTER III
1419
Despatches on Lincolns Election 1423Excitement in Charleston 1424Public Offices Abdi
1425
CHAPTER XI
1430
Ordinance of Secession Adopted 1431Public Excitement 1431Signing the Ordinance
1433
sionists Foiled 1441Floyd Succeeded by Holt
1441
People Bewildered 1446Fate of Leaders 1446 Secession in other States 1447Seizure
1448
of his Escape 1458His Inauguration and Inaugural Address 1460Duties of the Adminis
1454
CHAPTER VII
1466
Joyful Feelings in Charleston 1470Gratitude of the Loyal People Displayed 1470Honors
1476
sions 1480Poetic Comments on them 1481Events at Harpers Ferry and Gosport Navy
1485
Sewalls Point 1492Loyalty in Western Virginia 1492Action of the Secessionists 1492
1492
Conventions 1492Creation and Admission of a New State 1493Troops from Beyond
1499
National Troops on the Upper Potomac 1503The Capital in Danger 1503A Gunpowder
1507
Campaign 1514Secessionists Repressed in Baltimore 1515Confederate Privateers 1515
1515
Run and its Effects 1518War in the West 1522General Lyons Campaign 1522Military
1522
Fremont Superseded 1528Battle at Belmont 1529Military Movements in Northwestera
1535
of the British Government and Press 1540President Lincolns Wisdom 1540Release of
1543
West of the Mississippi 1544Missouri Purged of Armed Insurgents 1544The Campaign
1550
Engagements on Land and Water 1555A Desperate Measure Attempted 1555Council
1557
Movement toward Corinth 1562National Army at Pittsburg Landing 1562Buells Army
1563
Mitchels Raid into Alabama 1567Recovered Territory 1567Raid upon a Railway 1568
1568
1581Battle at Kernstown 1581Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula 1581Siege of York 1
1582
Battle at Fair Oaks 1587Stuarts Raid
1589
CHAPTER VI
1590
1991Battles at Savages Station WhiteOak Swamp and Glendale 1591Battle at Malvern
1595
Flank Movement 1595Battles at Groveton Bulls Run and Chantilly 1595Call for Volun
1601
Operations Near 1606Capture of Baton Rouge 1607Destruction of the Arkansas
1608
Operations between Petersburg and Richmond 1657Kautzs Raid 1658Strugglès of Grant
1664
North Carolina 1668Invasion of Tennessee 1669Hoods Defeats and Escape 1670Con
1675
Panic in Richmond 1680_Flight of the Confederate Government 1681Richmond on Fire
1681
The Assassins Fate 1687Johnson President 1687A Murderous Plot 1687 Proposal
1689
CHAPTER XXVI
1702
ment 1703Character of the President 1703Justice for the Freedmen 1704Motives
1709
Reinstated 1715Johnson against Grant 1715Reconstruction Acts 1715A Highhanded
1720
CHAPTER XXVIII
1726
Domingo Question 1731Samana Bay Company 1731 Joint High Commission 1731Tribu
1736
The Panic 1741Indians and Indian Wars 1742 The Modocs 1742Cheap Transportation
1744
1750Organization of the Centennial Commission 1751Centennial Board of Finance 1752
1752
eign Missions 1874The Centenary of Washingtons Inauguration 1874The President
1789
Debt 1792Population in 1880 1792InterOceanic Canal 1792Inauguration of Pres
1796
Chester A Arthur becomes President 1798Trial of the Assassin Guiteau 1799 Changes
1802
The Silver Question 1805The Mormon Question 1806mChinese Immigration 1807The
1810
The Ruin of Gen Grant 1811The Greely Arctic Expedition 1812Deaths of Longfellow
1817
the National Treasury 1825The Dangerous Surplus 1825The State of the Navy 1826Sec
1832
Pools and Trusts 1833Trades Unions 1834Knights of Labor 1834The Strikes
1839
Combination and Individual Freedom 1840Employers and Employed 1840Resignation and 1
1845
Speeches by W M Evarts President Cleveland M Lefaivre C M Depew 1848The Fish
1859
Conference of Germany England and America at Washington 1859Suspended but Renewed
1869
1894Appalling Loss of Life 1895Descriptions by Eyewitnesses 1895Johnstown Swept
1894
Bill Passed 1900The Reciprocity Clause 1901The PanAmerican Congress 1901Treaties
1905
1907The Pension Bill 1908International Copyright 1908The Census of 1890 1908
1913
DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
1918
ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION
1925
THE NATIONAL CONSTITUTION
1934
WASHINGTONS FAREWELL ADDRESS
1961
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1926 - For the more convenient management of the general interests of the United States, delegates shall be annually appointed in such manner as the legislature of each State shall direct, to meet in Congress on the first Monday in November, in every year, with a power reserved to each State, to recall its delegates, or any of them, at any time within the year, and to send others in their stead, for the remainder of the year.
Page 1973 - ... of commerce, but forcing nothing ; establishing, with powers so disposed, in order to give trade a stable course, to define the rights of our merchants, and to enable the government to support them, conventional rules of intercourse, the best that present circumstances and mutual opinion will permit, but temporary, and liable to be from time to time abandoned or varied, as experience and circumstances shall dictate ; constantly keeping in view, that it is folly in one nation to look for disinterested...
Page 1932 - Canada, acceding to this confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to, all the advantages of this Union ; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States.
Page 1927 - No state shall be represented in congress by less than two, nor by more than seven members; and no person shall be capable of being a delegate for more than three years in any term of six years; nor shall any person, being a delegate, be capable of holding any office under the United States, for which he, or another for his benefit, receives any salary, fees, or emolument of any kind.
Page 1967 - I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the state, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party, generally.
Page 1931 - ... place appointed and within the time agreed on by the United States in Congress assembled. But if the United States in Congress assembled shall, on consideration of circumstances, judge proper that any state should not raise men or should raise a smaller number than its quota and that any other state should raise a greater number of men than the quota thereof, such extra number shall be raised, officered...
Page 1597 - And shook it forth with a royal will. ' Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag,
Page 1958 - ... from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice President ; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two thirds of the whole number of senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice President of the United States.
Page 1965 - ... the Atlantic side of the Union, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one nation. Any other tenure by which the West can hold this essential advantage, whether derived from its own separate strength or from an apostate and unnatural connection with any foreign power, must be intrinsically precarious.
Page 1967 - In all the changes to which you may be invited, remember that time and habit are at least as necessary to fix the true character of governments, as of other human institutions...

Bibliographic information