Page images
PDF
EPUB

I want to call attention to the fact that this Guntersville Dam is in the heart of the valley, and that the reservoir connected with it is the longest reservoir in the whole system, present or projected. This reservoir is 82.1 miles above it. It is the longest, except the Gilbertsville Dam reservoir.

I think it is highly important that every item requested in this bill should be granted. I think that you will find appropriations heretofore made have been economically spent. It is true that there may have been some mistakes. But I think that those mistakes have been minor ones; and every dollar you appropriate to these gentlemen will be wisely and efficiently spent, and that the Nation as a whole will derive untold benefit.

I certainly appreciate this opportunity, and I thank the members of this committee for their kindness in this matter.

TUESDAY, APRIL 13, 1937.

CONSTRUCTION OF GILBERTSVILLE DAM

STATEMENT OF HON. KENNETH MCKELLAR, A UNITED STATES

SENATOR FROM THE STATE OF TENNESSEE

Mr. WOODRUM, Senator McKellar, of Tennessee, would like to make a statement to the committee in reference to the Gilbertsville Dam, and we are glad to extend the courtesy of the committee to him at this time.

Senator McKELLAR. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, I am going to speak just a word in favor of beginning the construction of the Gilbertsville Dam in Kentucky.

As you know, we are now building a dam at Pickwick Landing in the southern part of Tennessee, where the river turns to go north through Tennessee and into Kentucky, where it flows into the Ohio River.

For several years we have tried to get a provision through for the construction of the Gilbertsville Dam, but they had a good deal of trouble in finding a foundation.

Dr. Morgan tells me now that he has found an excellent foundation for that dam at or near Gilbertsville, and Senator Logan, Senator Barkley, Senator Bachman and myself are particularly very greatly interested in the building of that dam.

I am informed by Dr. Morgan that he thinks that he could use for that construction an amount of $2,750,000, during the ensuing year, and I want to ask the committee to add that much to the appropriation. I think $750,000 is already in the plan, and he thinks he can spend economically the amount of $2,750,000, so it would require an additional $2,000,000.

That will be the largest storage dam on the entire river. The dam will extend entirely across from north to south through the State of Tennessee, and it will extend well into Kentucky. It will make a very large storage dam that will back the water for about 184 miles. You can see what a large storage dam that will be and what

an immense effect a storage dam of that kind would have on the flood waters downstream.

We people in Tennessee believe that, in connection with the last flood, that the Norris Dam and the other dams on the Tennessee River, but especially Norris Dam, had a great deal to do with saving the Tennessee cities on the river, especially Chattanooga, from overflow. We believe that this Gilbertsville Dam will help the matter of overflow very greatly by the building of this great amount of storage.

The Tennessee Valley Authority engineers have found a sound foundation and are ready to go to work. I just want to urge the committee with all the earnestness of which I am capable to put an additional amount of at least $2,000,000 in the bill so that this work can be begun and completed as soon as possible.

I thank the committee for allowing me to be heard at this time. You are very kind.

Congressman Pearson, who represents the district in which this dam will be located, would like to make a statement to the committee.

TUESDAY, APRIL 13, 1937.

CONSTRUCTION OF GILBERTSVILLE DAM

STATEMENT OF HON. HERRON PEARSON, A REPRESENTATIVE IN

CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF TENNESSEE

Mr. WOODRUM. Mr. Pearson, the committee will be glad to have a statement from you at this time in reference to the Gilbertsville Dam.

Mr. PEARSON. Mr. Chairman, I did not come here with the idea of making a statement at this time, but I thank you for the opportunity. I was intending to appear tomorrow when called by the committee.

I simply would like to emphasize what Senator McKellar has said to the committee with reference to this particular dam. I am under the same impression that he is with reference to their ability to expend $2,750,000. That is in connection with the preliminary work, and probably some construction work on the Gilbertsville Dam during this coming fiscal year. In fact I have been told by the Directors that such is the fact.

I understand that in connection with the reduction of the amount which the Tennessee Valley Authority is now asking for, the major portion of the reduction which has been suggested was made from the Gilbertsville allocation, reducing it from approximately $2,750,000 to about $750,000.

I am sure that Mr. Lilienthal and Dr. Morgan both of whom are present will bear me out in the statement that the ultimate completion of the work to be done on the Tennessee River cannot be accomplished until after the work on the lower Tennessee at or near Gilbertsville is completed. That is a vital unit in the whole system. This is particularly true as applied to the scheme of flood control and navigation.

It has been put off on the theory that the other dams were more necessary, and that this dam could come in at the last of the program. But it is one of the most important projects, if not the most important project right now in the whole Tennessee Valley. I cannot state too urgently or emphatically to this committee the dire need which we feel for the appropriation of this money to get the Gilbertsville Dam started.

I realize fully the responsibility of this committee, that you are trying to do an economical job. I am always hesitant to ask for an increase in an appropriation item. And I would hesitate in this instance if I did not feel that it was for the ultimate good of the productive work that the Tennessee Valley Authority is trying to accomplish, and I hope that the Directors in their testimony will bear me out in the statement that there is great need for this dam in that area.

I thank you for giving me this opportunity to make a statement at this time, Mr. Chairman.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14, 1937.

.

GILBERTSVILLE DAM CONSTRUCTION

Mr. WOODRUM. Mr. Gregory, of Kentucky, desires to make a statement to the committee on the Gilbertsville Dam.

We will be very glad to hear you at this time, Mr. Gregory.

STATEMENT OF HON. NOBLE J. GREGORY, A REPRESENTATIVE

IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF KENTUCKY

Mr. GREGORY. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate your courtesy in allowing me to make a brief statement to you with reference to the Gilbertsville Dam.

It is not my desire to clutter the records of this committee with an extensive statement with reference to the Tennessee Valley Authority program, but I do wish to express to this committee my deep interest in the construction of the Gilbertsville Dam on the Tennessee River and the deep interest of the citizens of western Kentucky and Tennessee in its early construction.

I wish to heartily concur in the statements which have been made by Senator McKellar and Representative Pearson, of Tennessee, and others who have appeared in behalf of this project, and on behalf of the people of my section I wish to ask that the appropriation for this year be placed at $2,740,000, as I am advised that this will meet with the approval of the Authority, and that they can well use this amount to begin the construction of this all-important dam.

I further wish to suggest that whatever amount you may set aside to allocate for this purpose may be allocated for the purpose of preliminary investigation and construction. I am advised that the preliminary surveys and investigations are rapidly reaching completion.

I have just discussed the matter with Dr. Arthur E. Morgan, and, while he says that there is some preliminary work yet to be done, funds could be well used for preliminary construction,

It is our information and belief that the construction of this dam at this time on the Tennessee River gives assurance of early navigable use of the Tennessee creating a 9-foot navigable channel, and rendering this river immediately navigable while otherwise it would not become so navigable until this particular dam is completed. In other words, until the Gilbertsville Dam is completed the navigation feature of the Tennessee River would be of limited value.

The people of the flood-stricken area of Kentucky and Tennessee earnestly solicit your cooperation toward early construction as a further protective measure against future floods and disasters such as have so recently swept this particular section.

It is hoped that your committee will give this matter earnest consideration.

I have just discussed that feature with Dr. Morgan this morning, and he tells me that in his opinion the construction of this dam would be justified as a reservoir feature, if for no other reason.

I am sure you gentlemen have followed the story of the recent flood and its effects, and that this feature alone, if no other, is of great interest to you.

I want to express my appreciation, Mr. Chairman, for your courtesy in allowing me to give you my views on this matter, and I hope you will give the matter your favorable consideration.

Mr. WOODRUM. We thank you for your statement, Mr. Gregory. Analysis of obligations under Administrative expenses, Adjusted Compensation

Payment Act

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Analysis of obligations under "Administrative expenses, Adjusted Compensation

Payment Act” -Continued

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »