The Geographic Revolution in Early America: Maps, Literacy, and National Identity

Front Cover
UNC Press Books, 2006 - History - 276 pages
The rapid rise in popularity of maps and geography handbooks in the eighteenth century ushered in a new geographic literacy among nonelite Americans. In a pathbreaking and richly illustrated examination of this transformation, Martin Bruckner argues that
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - michaelm42071 - LibraryThing

Traditional accounts of the influence of geography on American identity focus on physical geography: how the Virginia natural bridge affected Jefferson, the effect of the landscape on various artists ... Read full review

Contents

The Geographic Revolution in the Wilderness
1
Geodesy Writing and Colonial Identity in EighteenthCentury British America
16
Geography Oratory and the Figuration of Identity in Revolutionary America
51
3 Maps Spellers and the Semiotics of Nationalism in the Early Republic
98
4 Geography Textbooks and Reading National Character
142
5 Novel Geographies of the Republic
173
6 Native American Geographies and the Journals of Lewis and Clark
204
Geography Education and the Aesthetic of Territoriality
238
Index
265
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Martin Bruckner is associate professor of English at the University of Delaware.