The Tuftonian, Volume 26

Front Cover
Tufts College, 1900
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 79 - See, what a grace was seated on this brow ; Hyperion's curls, the front of Jove himself, An eye like Mars, to threaten and command, A station like the herald Mercury New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill, A combination and a form indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man.
Page 84 - AH, what is love ? It is a pretty thing, As sweet unto a shepherd as a king ; And sweeter too, For kings have cares that wait upon a crown, And cares can make the sweetest love to frown : Ah then, ah then, If country loves such sweet desires do gain, What lady would not love a shepherd swain...
Page 79 - Mercury, New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your husband. — Look you now, what follows : Here is your husband ; like a mildew'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor?
Page 77 - Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? You cannot call it love, for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment; and what judgment Would step from this to this? Sense...
Page 68 - listed, That carries no colours or crest. But, split in a thousand detachments, Is breaking the road for the rest.
Page 111 - Tis as the general pulse Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause; An awful pause! prophetic of her end.
Page 228 - BE and continue poor, young man, while others around you grow rich by fraud and disloyalty ; be without place or power, while others beg their way upward ; bear the pain of disappointed hopes, while others gain the accomplishment of theirs by flattery ; forego the gracious pressure of the hand, for which others cringe and crawl. Wrap yourself in your own virtue, and seek a friend, and your daily bread. If you have, in such a course, grown gray with unblenched honour, bless God, and die.
Page 200 - Gent, being Sick and weak of Body but of perfect Mind and Memory...
Page 77 - Like Niobe, all tears; why she, even she, — O God ! a beast, that wants discourse of reason, Would have mourn'd longer, — married with my uncle, My father's brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules...
Page 135 - Faithfulness to the truth of history involves far more than a research, however patient and scrupulous, into special facts. Such facts may be detailed with the most minute exactness, and yet the narrative, taken as a whole, may be unmeaning or untrue.

Bibliographic information