Page images
PDF
EPUB

3

President of the College ; and till within two or three years of his death, he was pastor of the First Church, in which position he exerted a controlling influeuce over the students as well as over the inhabitants. By his fervid and untiring zeal, and his deep and earnest love for souls, united with a mind of extraordinary strength and energy, he made here, as everywhere, upon the multitudes whom he drew under his influence, impressions salutary and lasting. Beyond question Oberlin has received its practical and earnest religious charac ter largely from him.

[ocr errors]

SOURCES OF INFORMATION.

In tlie preceding sketch free use has been made of a little book by Presiilent Fairchild, entitled, “Oberlin, its Origin, Progress and Results," delivered first as an address to the alumni in 1860, and re-published in 1871. This is the best history and characterization of Oberlin that has yet been written. “A Historical Sketch of Oberlin College " has also been published in pamphlet form, by E. H. Fairchild, for many years Principal of the Preparatory Department, and now President of Berea College.

President Fairchild's Inaugural Address, delivered in 1866, and published in pamphlet form, discusses “ Educational Arrangements and College Life at Oberlin ;" and in July, 1867, he also delivered, before a meeting of College Presidents at Springfield, Ill., an address on “The Co-education of the Sexes," which was published in pamphlet form. To these, together with the annual and triennial catalogues, those who desire further information are referred.

[blocks in formation]

1831 IX35 1836 1837 1838

[blocks in formation]

93 117

192 338 390

3

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

17 16 12 8

1 5

10

133 166 193

8
181
16
17
1:

8
16

70 68 113 140 127 141

404 184 360 37

102

103 91 90 95 102 110 129 140 121 117

[blocks in formation]

480 327

16

17
12

[blocks in formation]

7
5

1840 18 181

64 1813

4 1813

13 1814 1815

32 1916 1817 18 18

27 181937 1880

20 1851

23 1852 183 1854 1865 1856 1837 1958

21 1800 1861

33

[ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

10

411 128 513 534 571 1920 1345 1193 1063 1216

[blocks in formation]

188 182 178 159 162 201 217 2:1 159 383 313 484 339 513 313 ANS 176 172 102 167

[ocr errors][merged small]

373
131
27 157 265
21 118
23 118 271
56 237 218
84 297 307
68 294

382
73 280 343
50, 198 292
35 211 345
28:01, 314
28 176, 282
34 186 266
88 328 342
54259 317
93 324

330
211 670 361
303 913 736
284' 841
290, 717 578
290 89

677

669 255, 10

736 258 828

735 254, 855

835
720' 633 399
218 528 457
293 564

430
300 573 109
313 728 536
301 812 655
294) 779 640
283 750 628
25 697
221 713 700
218 674 710
227 631 648
298 783 723
271 691 697
198 629 648

439 803 557 457 338 310 390 579 601 107

94 17:
92 11
110 10,
127 15
137
119
191 16

30
19)
147 15
12? 16
112 30
93 16

3
6
3
1

231

8

1949 1213 1313 1071 859 917

5

310

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

484

3
4
2

1863
IS:6 : 21

13
196
1867
1868

11 1803

16

25 1571 1873 38

43 1671 1875

51

271 273 410 511 481 467 113

[blocks in formation]

147

173 477 599 500

[ocr errors]

1920 1145 1131 1100 1!11 1229 1210 1171 1371 1330 1216

19 11 31 19 17 31 16 16

179 170 137 169 159 166 170 145

108 142 139 159 147

[blocks in formation]

35

618
633
368

Por simmary spe previous pidet.

FACULTY OF OBERLIN COLLEGE,

1876.

[ocr errors]

REV. JAMES H. FAIRCHILD, PRESIDENT,
Prof. of Theology, and Avery Professor of Moral Philosophy

Rev. JOHN MORGAN,
Prof. of New Testament Literature and Biblical Theology.

JAMES DASCOMB, M. D.,
Professor of Chemistry, Botany and Physiology.

Rev. John M. ELLIS,
Professor of Mental Philosophy and Rhetoric.

Rev. CHARLES H. CHURCHILL,
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.

Rev. Judson Smith,
Prof. of Church History, and Lecturer on Modern History

Gues W. SHURTLEFF, A. M.,
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature.

Rev. HIRAM MEAD,
Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral Theology.

REV. WM. H. RYDER,
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature.

FENELON B. RICE,

Professor of Music.

Rev. Elijah P. BARROWS,
Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature.

Rev. JAMES H. LAIRD,
Principal of the English Preparatory School.

ALBERT A. WRIGHT, A. M., Ph. B.,
Professor of Geology and Natural History.

JAMES K. NEWTON, A. M.,
Prof. of the German and French Languages and Literatures.

JAMES R. SEVERANCE, A. M.,

Instructor in Elocution.

HENRY F. CLARK, A. M.,
Associate Professor of Latin and Greek.

Mrs. A. A. F. JOHNSTON,
Principal of the Ladies' Department.

[merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed]

In common with others in various parts of the State, had its origin in the wide-spread belief that Ohio needed something more than the mere academy, college or high school, in which to prepare her teachers for the arduous and responsible task of training her one million and seventeen thousand children.

This conviction found frequent expression in written articles, and in able discussions in her educational councils, as early as 1850; and in 1856, an effort was made by the teachers themselves, to establish such a school in the eastern part of the State, under the auspices of the Ohio State Teachers' Association. But the burden proving too great for them, it was abandoned, after a few years' trial, and the school continued as a private enterprise.

Other States had already expended large sums of money in establishing Normal Schools. These schools soon became so deservedly popular, and their necessity seemed so apparent in our own State, that the matter was frequently brought before the Legislature by the leading teachers, and more recently in the shape of recommendations in the School Commissioners' Reports. But for reasons best known to herself, the State of Ohio has thus far refused to listen to these appeals, and has delayed the recognition of this want, in any direct aid, other than the provisions made for County Teachers' Institutes.

This public neglect of one of the most manifest wants. whether unavoidable or not, has naturally led to the organization of a number of private Normal Schools, and Normal Departments in Academies and Colleges, which, at the best, are inadequate, both as to number and efficiency, for the great work of training an army of teachers every year. This inefficiency does not necessarily arise from any defect in colleges, as such, but from the incompatibility of the work they have undertaken to do. This work is largely professional, and can only be provided for at heavy expense, and the necessary diversion of much that belongs exclusively to college work. The State could, however, well afford to organize and endow Normal Departments in her Universities, and in her Agricultural and Mechanical College, and thus add largely to their popularity and usefulness.

The wisdom of the larger cities, in providing for this professional training of their teachers, is in striking contrast with that of the State at large; and the results are telling with marked effect upon the character of the schools, when compared with those of similar grade, where no such provisions have yet been made. But it is to be hoped that when Ohio does move in this matter, it will be with a liberality and a dignity becoming her acknowledged greatness.

The organization and equipment of a school exhibiting all the grades of teaching and management, from the primary to the most advanced, has long been a cherished scheme of the writer; that such a school, under wise and

« PreviousContinue »