LIFE AND SERVICES OF GENERAL U.S. GRANT, CONQUEROR OF THE REBELLION, AND EIGHTEENTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 84 - From the first, I was firm in the conviction that no peace could be had that would be stable and conducive to the happiness of the people, both North and South, until the military power of the rebellion was entirely broken.
Page 80 - Mr. President, I accept the commission, with gratitude for the high honor conferred. With the aid of the noble armies that have fought in so many fields for our common country, it will be my earnest endeavor not to disappoint your expectations. I feel the full weight of the responsibilities now devolving on me ; and I know that if they are met, it will be due to those armies, and above all, to the favor of that Providence which leads both nations and men.
Page 116 - The arms, artillery and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officer appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.
Page 29 - Saviour. This faith gave you victory at Shiloh and Vicksburg. Also, when you have completed your best preparations, you go into battle without hesitation, as at Chattanooga, — no doubts, no reserves; and, I tell you, it was this that made us act with confidence. I knew, wherever I was, that you thought of me ; and, if I got in a tight. place, you would help me out if alive.
Page 82 - Not expecting to see you again before the spring campaign opens, I wish to express in this way my entire satisfaction with what you have done up to this time, so far as I understand it. The particulars of your plans I neither know nor seek to know.
Page 79 - You are now Washington's legitimate successor, and occupy a position of almost dangerous elevation ; but if you can continue, as heretofore, to be yourself — simple, honest, and unpretending — you will enjoy through life the respect and love of friends and the homage of millions of human beings...
Page 151 - I can but regard this whole matter from the beginning to the end as an attempt to involve me in the resistance of law, for which you hesitated to assume the responsibility in orders, and thus to destroy my character before the country.
Page 22 - They mean to cut their way out; they have no idea of staying here to fight us. Whichever party now attacks first will whip, and the rebels will have to be very quick if they beat me.
Page 80 - With this high honor, devolves upon you, also, a corresponding responsibility. As the country herein trusts you, so, under God, it will sustain you. I scarcely need to add, that, with what I here speak for the nation, goes my own hearty personal concurrence.
Page 152 - Constitution, etc.; that they continued to discuss the matter some time, and finally he left, without any conclusion having been reached, expecting to see the President again on Monday.

Bibliographic information