Compendium of Transportation Theories: A Compilation of Essays Upon Transportation Subjects by Eminent Experts

Front Cover
Kensington Publishing Company, 1893 - Railroads - 295 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 154 - passengers or property, wholly by railroad or partly by railroad and partly by water when both are used under a common control, management or arrangement, for a continuous carriage or shipment from one state or territory of the United States or the District of Columbia, to any other state or territory of the
Page 124 - First. That an agreement or combination by two or more persons to do or to procure to be done any act in contemplation or furtherance of a trade dispute between employers and workmen, shall not be indictable as a conspiracy, if such act committed by one person would not be punishable as a crime;
Page 74 - powers, afford all reasonable, proper and equal facilities for the interchange of traffic between their respective lines and for the receiving, forwarding and delivering of passengers and property to and from their several lines and those connecting therewith, etc.
Page 154 - of entry, either in the United States or an adjacent foreign country. Provided, however, that the provisions of this act shall not apply to the transportation of passengers or property, or to the receiving, delivering, storage or handling of property wholly within one state, and not shipped to or from a foreign country, from or to any state or territory as aforesaid.
Page 124 - to procure to be done any act in contemplation or furtherance of a trade dispute between employers and workmen, shall not be indictable as a conspiracy, if such act committed by one person would not be punishable as a crime; that is,
Page 74 - freights from being and being treated as one continuous carriage from the place of shipment to the place of destination, unless such break, stoppage or interruption was made in good faith for some necessary purpose, and without any intent to avoid or unnecessarily interrupt such continuous carriage or to evade any of the provisions of this act.
Page 66 - the railroad companies had respect for such opposition. Different gauges were adopted in many instances for the express purpose of preventing '' the carriage of freights from being, and being treated as one continuous carriage from the place of shipment to the place of destination,
Page 279 - in the act to regulate commerce as "where passengers and freight pass over continuous lines or routes operated by more than one common carrier, and the several common carriers operating such lines or routes establish joint tariffs of rates or fares or charges for such continuous lines or routes.
Page 218 - expressed or implied, to prevent, by change of time schedule, carriage in different cars, or by other means or devices. the carriage of freight from being continuous from the place of shipment to the place of destination; and no break of bulk, stoppage, or interruption made by such carrier shall prevent the carriage of
Page 219 - carrier shall prevent the carriage of freights from being and being treated as one continuous carriage from the place of shipment to the place of destination, unless such break, stoppage, or interruption was made in good faith for some necessary purpose, and without any intent to avoid or unnecessarily interrupt such continuous carriage, or to evade any of the provisions of this act.

Bibliographic information