Only the Paranoid Survive: How to Exploit the Crisis Points that Challenge Every Company and Career

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 1997 - Competition - 210 pages
Under Grove's leadership, Intel has become the world's largest computer chipmaker. The moments in business when huge change occurs are called strategic inflection points (SIPS). Grove extrapolates the lessons he has learned from SIPs to deliver an insight into the management of change.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - watson_1 - LibraryThing

This was an interesting book telling of the rise of Intel and how Intel was able to survive in a very fast-moving industry. The book was written in 1996. Many business books can quickly date ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Miro - LibraryThing

A magnificent book about strategic analysis and action in fast changing environments. There are lots of ways to fail (hence the paranoia) which he discusses in a straightforward way. He emphasises the ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1997)

Andrew S. Grove is chairman and former CEO of Intel Corporation in Santa Clara, California. He is the author of several books on technology and management, including High Output Management (1983), One-on-One With Andy Grove: How to Manage Your Boss, Yourself, and Your Co-Workers (1987) and Only the Paranoid Survive (1996). He has also written a weekly column on management for the San Jose Mercury News. Born September 2, 1936, in Budapest, Hungary, Grove emigrated to the U.S. in 1957 and became a naturalized citizen in 1962. He studied Chemical Engineering at City College in New York, and earned a Ph.D. in 1963 from University of California, Berkeley. He began working at Fairchild Semiconductor Research Laboratory in San Jose, California in 1963, gradually moving up the ranks to become Assistant Director of Research and Development in 1967. He joined Intel Corporation in 1968 as Vice President and Director of Operations. In 1997, Grove received the Technology Leader of the Year award from Industry Week, and was named Man of the Year by Time Magazine.

Bibliographic information