Learning to be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native": Selected Writings

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 2001 - Social Science - 371 pages
This prodigious volume represents a landmark assemblage of the significant work of the legendary anthropologist and Native American intellectual Beatrice Medicine.

For half a century, Dr. Medicine has defied stereotypes, racism, and sexism in her life and work while combating the reductive, patronizing views of Native Americans perpetuated by mainstream anthropologists. This retrospective collection reflects her unswerving commitment to furthering Native Americans' ability to speak for themselves and deal with the problems of contemporary life.

Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native" includes Medicine's clear-eyed views of assimilation, bilingual education, and the adaptive strategies by which Native Americans have conserved and preserved their ancestral languages. Her discussions of sex roles in contemporary Native American societies encompass homosexual orientation among males and females and the "warrior woman" role among Plains Indians as one of several culturally accepted positions according power and prestige to women. The volume also includes Medicine's thoughtful assessments of kinship and family structures, alcoholism and sobriety, the activism implicit in the religious ritual of the Lakota Sioux Sun Dance, and the ceremonial uses of Lakota star quilts.

"The Native American is possibly the least understood ethnic minority in contemporary American society," Medicine observes. Her decades of deliberate, generous, dedicated work have done much to reveal the workings of Native culture while illuminating the effects of racism and oppression on Indian families, kinship units, and social and cultural practices.


 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VI
3
VII
17
VIII
19
IX
35
X
50
XI
58
XII
66
XIII
73
XXVI
175
XXVII
177
XXVIII
191
XXIX
197
XXX
207
XXXII
228
XXXIII
237
XXXIV
239

XIV
83
XV
91
XVI
108
XVII
115
XVIII
117
XIX
128
XX
137
XXII
147
XXIII
153
XXIV
161
XXV
167
XXXV
254
XXXVI
267
XXXVII
269
XXXVIII
289
XXXIX
295
XL
312
XLI
317
XLII
323
XLIII
333
XLIV
347
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Dr. Beatrice Medicine, professor emeritus of anthropology at California State University at Northridge, is the author of Native American Women: A Perspective and coeditor of The Hidden Half: Indian Women on the Plains.Sue-Ellen Jacobs is a professor of women's studies at the University of Washington at Seattle. Her books include Two-Spirit People: Native American Gender Identity, Sexuality, and Spirituality.Ted Garner, Beatrice Medicine's son, is a sculptor who lives in Chicago. He holds a B.F.A. from the Kansas City Art Institute. Faye V. Harrison is a professor of anthropology at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Her books include African-American Pioneers in Anthropology.

Bibliographic information