Greater America

Front Cover
Harper, 1904 - America - 435 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 392 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Page 348 - Staff; and to perform such other military duties not otherwise assigned by law as may be from time to time prescribed by the President.
Page 348 - ... professional aid and assistance to the Secretary of War and to general officers and other superior commanders, and to act as their agents in informing and coordinating the action of all the different officers who are subject under the terms of this Act to the supervision of the Chief of Staff ; and to perform such other military duties not otherwise assigned by law as may be from time to time prescribed by the President.
Page 348 - Its principal duties are to prepare plans for the national defense and for the mobilization of the military forces in time of war; to investigate and report upon all questions affecting the efficiency of the Army and its state of preparation for military operations; to render professional aid and assistance to the Secretary of War and to general officers and other superior commanders and to act as their agents in informing and coordinating the action of all the different officers who are subject...
Page 126 - That would be a price, and I would immediately erect a column on the southernmost limit of Cuba and inscribe on it a ne plus ultra as to us in that direction.
Page 119 - The physiological basis of this experience appears to be that any one variety of creature in course of many generations acquires a certain constitutional adaptation to its particular form of life, and every other variety similarly acquires its own special adaptation. The consequence is that, if you mix the...
Page 126 - The position of Cuba gives the United States so deep an interest in the destiny, even of that island, that although they might be an inactive, they could not be a satisfied spectator at its falling under any European government which might make a fulcrum of that position against the commerce and security of the United States.
Page 348 - Nation and its material resources in an emergency, to investigate and report upon all questions affecting the efficiency of the Army...
Page 288 - We do not desire to do for the islanders merely what has elsewhere been done for tropic peoples by even the best foreign governments. We hope to do for them what has never before been done for any people of the tropics — to make them fit for self-government after the fashion of the really free nations.
Page 127 - ... it is scarcely possible to resist the conviction that the annexation of Cuba to our federal Republic will be indispensable to the continuance and integrity of the Union itself.

Bibliographic information