Parliamentary Papers, Volume 51

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - ... that it may be declared and enacted, that all and singular the rights and liberties asserted and claimed in the said declaration are the true, ancient and indubitable rights and liberties of the people of this kingdom...
Page 6 - Ffrench, with respect to the inability of the magistrates attending such meetings to repress violence, it bears diametrically the opposite way ; for no individual could possibly have so direct and personal an interest in preventing violence and suppressing outrage as magistrates who are parties to, and responsible for, the calling together of such meetings. With respect to your assertion that Her Majesty has, like Her predecessor, expressed " Her determination to prevent the carrying of the repeal...
Page 6 - Throne and to the people. That the repeal meetings to petition Parliament are not illegal, is a proposition admitted in your letter to Lord Ffrench ; and really you must permit me to say, that it is in no slight degree absurd to allege that these meetings " have an inevitable tendency to outrage! ! ! " Why, meetings were held, as...
Page 6 - ... and as peaceably, before the passing of the Emancipation Act as during the present Repeal agitation. There have been within the last three months more than twenty of these multitudinous meetings to petition, without having caused a single breach of peace. How then they can have ' an inevitable tendency to outrage...
Page 6 - Union," it has rilled me with the most utter and inexpressible astonishment. You must know — and indeed I much fear you must have known when you made that assertion — that it was utterly unfounded in fact. Sir Robert Peel has himself admitted the falsity of that statement. Her Majesty, whom the people of Ireland affectionately revere, has made no such declaration. And indeed, I must say, it enhances the criminality of the Lord Chancellor that he has permitted the putting forward, under the sanction...
Page 6 - Union,' it has filled me with the most utter and inexpressible astonishment. You must know, and indeed I much fear you must have known when you made that assertion, that it was utterly unfounded in fact. Sir Robert Peel has himself admitted the falsity of that statement. Her Majesty, whom the people of Ireland affectionately revere, has made no such declaration, and indeed I must say it enhances the criminality of the Lord Chancellor that he has permitted the putting forward, under the sanction of...
Page 4 - ... arrived for evincing the determination of this government to delegate no power to those who seek by such measures as are now pursued to dissolve the Legislative Union. To allow such persons any longer to remain in the commission of the peace would be to afford the power of the crown to the carrying of a measure which her Majesty has, like her predecessor, expressed her determination to prevent.
Page 6 - For the terms of civility in which that letter is couched, I owe you, sir, and I hereby offer you, my best thanks. " I would not willingly be exceeded by you in courtesy, and I beg of you to believe that, if in the performance of a sacred duty I should use any expression of a harsh nature, which I shall studiously endeavour to avoid, it is not my intention to say any thing personally offensive. But that duty obliges me to declare that, as the restoration of the Irish Parliament is an event, in my...
Page 4 - ... measure which her Majesty has, like her predecessor, expressed her determination to prevent. This view of the case, which the step taken by your lordship has forced upon the attention of the Lord Chancellor, will compel him at once to supersede any other magistrates who, since the declarations in Parliament, have attended like Repeal meetings. He thinks that such a measure is not at variance with the resolution of the Government, whilst they watch over public tranquillity and oppose the Repeal...

Bibliographic information