Life and Letters of George Perkins Marsh, Volume 1

Front Cover
C. Scribner's sons, 1888 - Europe - 479 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 97 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 475 - Hope's Ancient Costumes, and more than one hundred volumes besides, mostly in folio or quarto, either composed entirely of valuable engravings, or in which the text is published for the sake of the illustrations of fine or decorative art. The collection of critical and historical works, in the various departments of the fine arts, comprises...
Page 222 - ... and that seemed but half open, while nothing about his person would have led one to believe that the waters of the broad Nile were within reach. There was an unmistakable look of mortification on the part of those who had consented to summon this ./Esculapius, but there was no help for it now. At this moment a visitor was announced to Mr. Marsh, and the lady, therefore, was the first to prove the wild man's skill. He examined the injured foot, placed it in warm water, dipped his own fingers in...
Page 455 - Whole House on the state of the Union and having under consideration the bill (HR 23730) making appropriations to supply deficiencies in appropriations for the fiscal year 1910, and for other purposes — Mr.
Page 222 - ... acquaintance. He entreated so earnestly and with such apparent confidence in his miracle-worker that a consultation was held with some of the oldest and most intelligent of the Frankish residents at Cairo, and, though no one would exactly take the responsibility of advising it, every one said that the evidence of these immediate cures was such that he should certainly try the experiment in his own case. Some, indeed, had tried it with entire success, and no one thought any harm could come of...
Page 78 - Happily for their posterity and and our forefathers were "harried out of the land," beprevailed, — majesty executed its magnanimous threat, and our forefathers were ''harried out of the land," before that character had become enervated, or its lofty energies spent, and they brought with them the moral virtues of the rigid Puritan, combined with the intellectual elevation of unfettered Christian philosophy, and the chivalrous heroism of bannered knighthood. Of the concurrent influences which contributed...
Page 80 - ... iron age. It is in this feeling, that we find the root of true conservatism, and every movement, whether retrograde or progressive, which wars with this sacred impulse, is not unwise merely, but unnatural, unchristian, criminal. It is to the want of an intelligent national pride — the universal solvent, which melts and combines into a harmonious whole the otherwise discordant traits of individual and local feeling — that we must ascribe the non-existence of a well-defined and consistent American...
Page 80 - ... be able to consume the flower, and raise it again out of its ashes. But it was at best a shadowy resurrection, and the visible image had neither fragrancy, color, nor life. A nation has but a single life, and the people that perishes, because it is recreant to itself, can hope for no palingenesia. We are then summoned by every consideration of present interest, of enlightened patriotism, of decent respect for the memory of our fathers, of reverence for the religion of our God, to do our utmost...
Page 18 - For we have not an High Priest who cannot be touched with the feeling" of our infirmities, but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.
Page 59 - Barberini, contains a world of truth, and had not Rome's own sons been her spoilers, she might have shone at this day in all the splendour of her Augustan age. England is Gothic by birth, Roman by adoption. Whatever she has of true moral grandeur, of higher intellectual power, she owes to the Gothic mother ; while her grasping ambition, her material energies, her spirit of exclusive selfishness, are due to the Roman nurse.

Bibliographic information