Page images
PDF
EPUB

§ 631. Evening school certificate.—The school authorities of a city of the first class or a city of the second class, or officers designated by them, are hereby required to issue to a boy lawfully in attendance at an evening school, an evening school certificate at least once in each month during the months sail evening school is in session and at the close of the term of said evening school, provided that said boy has been in attendance upon said evening school for not less than six hours each week for such number of weeks as will, when taken in connection with the number of weeks such evening school shall be in session during the remainder of the current or calendar year, make up a total attendance on the part of said boy in said evening school of not less than six hours per week for a period of not less than sixteen weeks or attendance upon a trade school for at least eight hours per week for not less than sixteen weeks. Such certificate shall state fully the period of time which the boy to whom it is issued was in attendance upon such evening school or trade school. (Added by chapter 140 of the Laws of 1910.)

$ 632. Attendance officers.- 1. The school authorities of each city, union free school district, or common school district whose limits include in whole or in part an incorporated village, shall appoint and may remove at pleasure one or more attendance officers of such city or district, and shall fix their compensation and may prescribe their duties not inconsistent with this article and make rules and regulations for the performance thereof; and the superintendent of schools shall supervise the enforcement of this article within such city or school district.

2. The town board of each town shall appoint, subject to the written approval of the school commissioner of the district, one or more attendance officers, whose jurisdiction shall extend over all school districts in said town, and which are not by this section otherwise provided for, and shall fix their compensation, which shall be a town charge; and such attendance officers, appointed by said board, shall be removable at the pleasure of the school commissioner in whose commissioner district such town is situated. (As amended by chapter 140 of the Laws of 1910.)

§ 633. Arrest of truants.- 1. The attendance officer may arrest without a warrant any child between seven and sixteen years of age who is a truant from instructioa upon which he is lawfully required to attend within the city or district of such attendance officer. He shall forthwith deliver the child so arrested to a teacher from whom such child is then a truant, or, in case of habitual and incorrigible truants, shall bring them before a police magistrate for commitment to a truant school as provided in section six hundred and thirty-five.

2. The attendance officer shall promptly report such arrest and the disposition which he makes of such child, to the school authorities of the said city or district where such child is lawfully required to attend upon instruction.

3. A truant officer in the performance of his duties may enter, during business hours, any factory, mercantile or other establishment within the city or school district in which he is appointed and shall be entitled to examine employment certificates or registry of children employed therein on demand. (As amended by chapter 140 of the Laws of 1910.)

§ 634. Interference with attendance officer.—Any person interfering with an attendance officer in the lawful discharge of his duties and any person owning or operating a factory, mercantile or other establishment who shall refuse on demand to exhibit to such attendance officer the registry of the children employed or the employment certificate of such children shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

$ 635. Truant schools.-- 1. The school authorities of any city or school district may establish schools, or set apart separate rooms in public school buildings, for children between seven and sixteen years of age, who are habitual truants from instruction upon which they are lawfully required to attend, or who are insubordinate or disorderly during their attendance upon such instruction, or irregular in such attendance. Such school or room shall be known as a truant school; but no person convicted of crimes or misdemeanors, other than truancy, shall be committed thereto.

2. School authorities may provide for the confinement, maintenance and instruction of such truants in such schools; and they,

or the superintendent of schools in any city or school district, may, after reasonable notice to such child and the persons in parental relation to such child, and an opportunity for them to be heard, and with the consent in writing of the persons in parental relation to such child, order such child to attend such school, or to be confined and maintained therein, under such rules and regulations as such authorities may prescribe, for a period not exceeding two years; but in no case shall a child be so confined after he is sixteen years of age.

3. Such authorities may order such a child to be confined and maintained during such period in any private school, orphans' home or similar institution controlled by persons of the same religious faith as the persons in parental relation to such child, and which is willing and able to receive, confine and maintain such child, upon such terms as to compensation as may be agreed upon between such authorities and such private school, orphans' home or similar institution.

4. If the person in parental relation to such child shall not consent to either of such orders said person shall be proceeded against in court under section six hundred and twenty-five of this chapter by the school authorities or such officer as they may designate. In case the person in parental relation to such child establishes to the satisfaction of the court that such child is beyond his control such child shall be proceeded against as a disorderly person, and upon conviction thereof, if the child was lawfully required to attend a public school, the child shall be sentenced to be confined and maintained in such truant school for a period not exceeding two years; or if such child was lawfully required to attend upon instruction otherwise than at a public school, the child may be sentenced to be confined and maintained for a period not exceeding two years in such private school, orphans' home or other similar institutions, if there be one, controlled by persons of the same religious faith as the persons in parental relation to such child, which is willing and able to receive, confine and maintain such child for a reasonable compensation. Such confinement shall be conducted with a view to the improvement and to the restoration, as soon as practicable, of such child to the institution elsewhere, upon which he may be lawfully required to attend.

5. The authorities committing any such child, and in cities and districts having a superintendent of schools such superintendent shall have authority, in his discretion, to parole at any time any truant so committed by them.

6. Every child lawfully suspended from attendance upon instruction for more than one week, shall be required to attend such truant school during the period of such suspension.

7. The school authorities of any city or school district, not having a truant school, may contract with any other city or district having a truant school, for the confinement, maintenance and instruction therein of children whom such school authorities might require to attend a truant school, if there were one in their own city or district.

8. Industrial training shall be furnished in every such truant school.

9. The expense attending the commitment and cost of maintenance of any truant residing in any city, or district, employing a superintendent of schools shall be a charge against such city, or district, and in all other cases shall be a county charge.

(As amended by chapter 409 of the Laws of 1909, and chapter 140 of the Laws of 1910.)

$ 636. Enforcement of law and withholding the state moneys by commissioner of education.-- 1. The commissioner of education shall supervise the enforcement of this law and he may withhold one-half of all public school moneys from any city or district, which, in his judgment, wilfully omits and refuses to enforce the provisions of this article, after due notice, so often and so long as such wilful omission and refusal shall, in his judgment, continue.

2. If the provisions of this article are complied with at any time within one year from the date on which said moneys were withheld, the moneys so withheld shall be paid over by said commissioner of education to such district or city, otherwise forfeited to the state. (As amended by chapter 140 of the Laws of 1910.)

[blocks in formation]

ARTICLE XXVI.

PIIYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE,

Section 690. Instruction regarding nature of alcoholic drinks.

691. Enforcement of last section. § 690. Instruction regarding nature of alcoholic drinks.1. The nature of alcoholic drinks and other narcotics and their effects on the human system shall be taught in connection with the various divisions of physiology and hygiene, as thoroughly as are other branches in all schools under state control, or supported wholly or in part by public money of the state, and also in all schools connected with reformatory institutions.

2. All pupils in the above-mentioned schools below the second year of the high school and above the third year of school work computing from the beginning of the lowest primary, not kindergarten, year, or in corresponding classes of ungraded schools, shall be taught and shall study this subject every year with suitable text-books in the hands of all pupils, for not less than three lessons a week for ten or more weeks, or the equivalent of the same in each year, and must pass satisfactory tests in this as in other studies before promotion to the next succeeding year's work; except that, where there are nine or more school years below the high school, the study may be omitted in all years above the eighth year and below the high school, by such pupils as have passed the required tests of the eighth year.

3. In all schools above-mentioned, all pupils in the lowest three primary, not kindergarten, school years or in corresponding classes in ungraded schools shall each year be instructed in this subject orally for not less than two lessons a week for ten weeks, or the equivalent of the same in each year, by teachers using text-books adapted for such oral instruction as a guide and standard, and such pupils must pass such tests in this as may be required in other studies before promotion to the next succeeding year's work. Nothing in this article shall be construed as prohibiting or requiring the teaching of this subject in kindergarten schools.

4. The local school authorities shall provide needed facilities and definite time and place for this branch in the regular courses of study.

« PreviousContinue »