Autumnal rambles among the Scottish mountains ; or, pedestrian tourist's friend

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 171 - And wear thou this" — she solemn said, And bound the Holly round my head : The polish'd leaves, and berries red, Did rustling play ; And, like a passing thought, she fled In light away.
Page 157 - Edina ! Scotia's darling seat ! All hail thy palaces and towers, 'Where once beneath a monarch's feet Sat Legislation's sovereign powers...
Page 213 - SCOTLAND! much I love thy tranquil dales ; But most on Sabbath eve, when low the sun Slants through the upland copse, 'tis my delight, Wandering, and stopping oft, to hear the song Of kindred praise arise from humble roofs...
Page 225 - ... climbing of hills has an admirable effect on the spirits at the time ; and I fancy there is enough of that sort of exercise in Devonshire. However, I hope you will be so national as to let me say, that a pretty little English knoll is not half so exhilarating as the top of a Scotch hill. Perhaps my feeling is partly prejudice — but it is not quite so ; therefore, though you should not join in it, do not hold it in utter derision ! I have jumped with joy, when, from the top of one of our own...
Page 111 - the best laid schemes o' mice and men gang aft a'-gley." The Captain's hopes were totally frustrated.
Page 48 - The view from its summit is of the most commanding description. The whole Frith of Clyde lies, as it were, mapped before you towards the west. The weather was by no means remarkably clear; still we saw the whole three miles from the ferry, and is seen from a considerable distance, being built on a slight eminence. Many of the houses are elegant structures. The principal street is...
Page 49 - ... circumference, which may be estimated at about three miles. A more desolate, dreary, unapproachable scene, can hardly be imagined. All its shores are of granite, bleached by the storms of ages, which, in such a region, probably 1200 feet at least above the sea, must rage with tremendous fury. It is intersected by dykes of granite, resembling artificial piers...
Page 225 - Nov. 1813. I suppose you are by this time returned from your Devonshire excursion, and I trust you have brought with you a stock of health and strength for the winter. I am not sure that the benefit is lasting ; but I know that the climbing of hills has an admirable effect on the spirits at the time ; and I fancy there is enough of that sort of exercise in Devonshire. However, I hope you will be so national as to let me say, that a pretty little English knoll is not half so exhilarating as the top...
Page 62 - Here are two respectable-looking manses, with as many churches,/reĢ and bond. It is difficult to conceive a more melancholy effect of the late Secession than is exemplified in this wretched island. Its poor, half-starved, ignorant population has not escaped the late epidemic; for we were informed that, few and mutually dependent as they are for comfort, those visited by the new light will scarcely recognise their former friends as beings of the same species with themselves ! This sad state of things...
Page 12 - As the very best advice I can give pedestrians, I would recommend early rising, and always turning over a good long stage before breakfast. This. I never failed to do when a young man ; and even now I like walking before breakfast best when on a journey. Fifteen or twenty miles before nine o'clock was my ordinary arrangement. This made the remainder of my journey comparatively easy ; and, after being fairly on the road, I generally enjoyed this part of my work most.

Bibliographic information