Page images
PDF
EPUB

month and completely bars the river between the piers of the fixed spans. The United States are spending large sums on the streams in this district, but it will have been thrown away if the privilege of crossing them is not to be subject to a proper control. It is time to make a beginning

Mr. Purcell, finding that there would be strong opposition to any bridge, and certainly to the bridge proposed as on tracing B, suggested that if I recommended clear openings of 125 feet, Pier O might be moved further west. This is a move in the right direction, for with Pier C in the first position there could be but one safe passage, no matter how large a draw were built. A great deal of annoyance and delay might have been avoided if these dimensions had been assumed in the first instance, for I suggested them myself to Mr. Purcell in July,

After a careful study of the section, and trial of a number of sections, I submit tracing C. The intersection of the axis of the bridge with the transit-line on the west bank marked 20 is assumed as correctly located and recoverable, and the centers of Piers A, B, C, D, and E are supposed to be on the axis normal to the channel line at'or near the place indicated by their number, which means so many feet from a certain point.

I recommend that permission be given to construct the bridge on the line indicated, the pivot-pier O to be at 23 and to be not over 30 feet in diameter, the draw-span to be of such length as to give openings on each side of Pier C not less than 125 feet in the clear and preferably not less than 130 feet. Piers B and D to be placed so that their centers shall not be nearer to Pier C than at 21.55 for B and at 24.45 for D, if the clear openings be made 125 feet, and proportionally removed if larger openings be required. Pier A to have its center no further east than 20.50, and Pier E its center no further west than 25.

Piers A and E may be built with wing-walls and filled behind with earth or piling, or trestle may be allowed.

The bottom chords of the supertructure between A and E should be placed at least 3 feet above highest floods to prevent accumulation of drift, and no projection trestle or piling should be allowed to form any part of the permanent work in the spaces between piers from A to E.

All the requirements of the act should be guarantied, and in addition an agreement sbould be obtained for obedience to rules for prompt opening on reasonable signal, maintaining proper lights, etc., as provided, for example, in section 2, No. 168, and sections 3, Nos. 171 and 181. It seems to be particularly necessary to allude to these points because, as a matter of fact, bridge tenders are notoriously careless and negligent. I have formed this opinion from hearing the experiences of others and from my personal observation on Hudson River, Mississippi, Yazoo, and Red rivers.

In submitting tracing C, I am not to be understood as offering a de. sign for a bridge, but only a sketch to show what seemed to me to be the best arrangement for piers and spans. The dimension and arrange

. ment of panels of the draw-span, however, were taken from a bridge built by the late Shaler Smith. The length of draw truss is 294 feet 8 inches center to center of pins and the dimensions of piers about the same throughout.

This bridge is a fine structure, was not very expensive, is used for general traffic as well as railway, and the draw is worked by hand easily and quickly. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILLARD, The CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. A. Captain of Engineers.

1

LETTER OF THE GENERAL MANAGER OF THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAIL

WAY COMPANY.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY,

Birmingham, Ala., September 30, 1887. DEAR SIR : I send you by express to-day maps, profiles, plans, etc., covering our proposed crossing at Sunflower and Yazoo rivers, which, together with papers now in the hands of Major Post, complete, I believe, all the information required, which we desire to submit for your consideration and approval, and would request that you give the matter your earliest consideration, as we desire to commence operations, especially at Sunflower, before the high-water season sets in. Yours, very truly,

I. Y. SAGE,

,

General Manager. CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. A.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

(First indorsemont.)

!

OFFICE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

U. S. ARMY,

October 14, 1887. Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War through the Acting Judge Advocate.General, U. S. Army.

The within plans for the bridges across the Sunflower and Yazoo rivers, provided for by "An act to authorize the Georgia Pacific Railroad Company to construct bridges across the Sunflower, Yazoo, and Tombigbee rivers in Mississippi," approved March 3, 1887, are submitted by the Georgia Pacific Railroad Company.

The plans for the bridge across the Sunflower River are in accordance with the provisions of the act of March 3, 1887, and are recommended for approval, subject to the condition that such services be maintained by the railroad company as may be necessary to insure prompt opening of the draw on reasonable signal, and that such sig. nals be displayed as are customary, or as are now and may hereafter be prescribed by the Light-House Department.

In regard to the plans for the bridge across the Yazoo River, which provide for a swing-bridge with openings of 115 feet in the clear, it is believed that the draw-openings are not sufficient to meet the requirements of navigation, and that they should be increased to 125 feet, as recommended by Capt. J. H. Willard, Corps of Engineers, in his report dated August 30, 1887, herewith, to which attention is respectfully invited. It will be seen that Captain Willard recommends that the bridge be constructed on the line indicated on tracing accompanying his report, the piers to be located so that there will be a draw. opening of a clear width of 125 feet upon both sides of the pivot-pier, the latter to be so placed as to include the best water in the draw-openings, the bottom chords of the superstructure to be placed at least 3 feet above highest floods to prevent accumulation of drift, and no projecting trestle or piling to be allowed to form any part of the perma. nent work in the spaces between piers. The views of Captain Willard are concurred in, and it is suggested that the railway company be fur. nished with a copy of Captain Willard's report on the Yazoo Bridge, with request that they present plans in conformity therewith.

CHAS. W. RAYMOND,

Acting Chief of Engineers.

(Second indorsement.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,
JUDGE-ADVOCATE-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., October 20, 1887. Respectfully forwarded to the Secretary of War, with formal instrnment for his approval (prepared in duplicate) of the design and draw. ings and map of the location of the bridge proposed to be built by the Georgia Pacific Railroad Company across the Sunflower River, in the State of Mississippi.

G. NORMAN LIEBER, Acting Judge- Advocate-General.

LETTER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, October 22, 1887. SIR: In reply to your letter of the 30th ultimo, transmitting, for approval by the Department, plans of a bridge proposed to be constructed across the Yazoo River by the Georgia Pacific Railway Company, I have the honor to inclose, for the information of the company, a copy of a report upon the proposed bridge by Capt. J. H. Willard, Corps of Engineers, with accompanying tracing, as suggested by the Acting Chief of Engineers, a copy of whose report of the 14th instant is also herewith. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM C. ENDICOTT,

Secretary of War. I. Y. SAGE, Esq., General Manager Georgia Pacific Railway Company,

Birmingham, Ala.

LETTER OF THE GENERAL MANAGER OF THE GEORGIA PACIFIC

RAILWAY COMPANY.

THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY,

Birmingham, Ala., January 23, 1888. DEAR SIR: The Georgia Pacific Railway Company desire to submit for the approval of the War Department the inclosed plans for constructing the draw-bridge across the Yazoo River. These plans bave been prepared in accordance with the suggestion of William C. Endicott, Secretary of War, October 22, 1887, based upon the recommendations of Charles W. Raymond, Acting Chief of Engineers, October 14, 1887, transmitting the report of J. II. Willard, Captain of Engineers, August 30, 1887. Yours, very truly,

I. Y. SAGE,

General Manager. CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. A.

| First indorsement.)

OFFICE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

U. S. ARMY,

February 7, 1888. Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. The within plans for the proposed bridge of the Georgia Pacific Railway Company across the Yazoo River, prepared under anthority granted by an act approved March 3, 1887, are in accordance with the requirements of the War De. partment, and are recommended for approval, subject to the condition that such services be maintained by the railroad company as may be necessary to insure prompt opening of the draw on reasonable signal, and that such signals be displayed as are customary, or as are now and may hereafter be prescribed by the Light-House Department.

The previous papers in the case were submitted to the War Department with indorsement of this office, dated October 14, 1887.

J. C. DUANE,
Brig. Gen., Chief of Engineers.

(Second indorsement.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,

February 9, 1888. Respectfully referred to the Acting Judge-Advocate-General to prepare the formal approval, in duplicate, with conditions as proposed by the Chief of Engineers. By order of the Secretary of War.

JOHN TWEEDALE,

Chief Clerk. (Third indorsement.)

WAR DEPARTMENT,
JUDGE-ADVOCATE-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., February 15, 1888. Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War, with formal instrument (prepared in duplicate), for his approval of the plans and location of the bridge proposed to be built by the Georgia Pacific Railroad Company across the Yazoo River, in the State of Mississippi.

Attention is invited to the fact that the extracts from the company's minutes, purporting to show the names of the officers of the company, are extracts from the minutes of meetiugs held respectively November 29 and December 18, 1886, at which meetings officers and directors were elected for the then ensuing year. There is nothing to show that the officers then elected are the present officers of the company.

G. NORMAN LIEBER, Acting Judge- Advocate-General.

LETTER TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY

COMPANY.

THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY,

Birmigham, Ala., March 24, 1888. SIR : Referring to your favors, October 21, 1887, and February 4, 1888, to I. Y. Sage, general manager, relative to the Sunflower River Bridge of this company, and to other letters relative to the Yazoo River Bridge of this company, I beg to explain that the delay in signing and return

I ing the papers has been due to the fact that an error appears in the act of Congress approved March 3, 1887, in that the corporate name of this company is given as the “Georgia Pacific Railroad Company.” Under the circumstances it was thought best to withhold the papers until another act of Congress could be gotten correcting this mistake and giving longer time within which to build the bridges. I have now advices from Senator George that the necessary bill has been passed in the Senate, and Representative Allen writes me that he hopes to pass this bill through the House next week.

We have recently sent to the office of the Chief of Engineers plans for our proposed bridge over the Tombigbee River, which bridge is covered by the same acts of Congress, and I hope that the papers for this bridge also can soon be gotten in shape for proper execution. So soon as the pending act of Congress becomes a law I will be prepared to execute the papers as to the Sunflower and Yazoo River bridges, and will do so and promptly return them to you. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. W. JOHNSTON,

President Georgia Pacific Railway Company. Hon. WILLIAM C. ENDICOTT,

Secretary of War.

LETTER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, April 28, 1888. SIR: Referring to Department letter to you of the 25th instant, relative to the bridges authorized to be erected by the Georgia Pacific Railway Company across the Yazoo and Tombigbee rivers, I have the honor to state that by inadvertence two copies of the instrument indicating approval of the plans of the bridge across the Yazoo River were transmitted to you, and to request that you return one of the copies in question to the Department.

I inclose for retention by your company a duly-executed copy of an instrument indicating approval by the Secretary of War, under certain specified conditions, of the location and plans of the bridge authorized to be constructed by the company over the Sunflower River, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved March 3, 1887, and the amendatory act approved April 2, 1888. Very respectfully,

WILLIAM C. ENDICOTT,

Secretary of War. Mr. J. W. JOHNSTON, President Georgia Pacific Railway Company,

Birmingham, Ala.

LETTER OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY

COMPANY.

THE GEORGIA PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY,

Birmingham, Ala., May 5, 1888. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your favor, 28th ultimo, inclosing for retention by this company an executed copy of the

« PreviousContinue »