Short, easy, and intellectual method of learning to read

Front Cover
H. Williamson, 1852 - 144 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - With soaring up so high ; Will you rest upon my little bed?" Said the Spider to the Fly. " There are pretty curtains drawn around ; The sheets are fine and thin, And if you like to rest awhile, I'll snugly tuck you in!
Page 116 - Oh no, no," said the little Fly, "to ask me is in vain; For who goes up your winding stair can ne'er come down again. "I'm sure you must be weary, dear, with soaring up so high; Will you rest upon my little bed?" said the Spider to the Fly. "There are pretty curtains drawn around, the sheets are fine and thin; And if you like to rest awhile, I'll snugly tuck you in!
Page 86 - ... 6. — THE TWO BEES. One fine morning in May, two bees set forward in quest of honey; the one wise and temperate, the other careless and extravagant. They soon arrived at a garden enriched with aromatic herbs, the most fragrant flowers, and the most delicious fruits. They regaled themselves for a time on the various dainties set before them ; the one loading his thighs at intervals with wax for the construction of his hive, the other revelling in sweets, without regard to any thing but present...
Page 116 - WILL you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly; " 'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy ; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to show when you are there."
Page vi - ... letters of the alphabet are perhaps in the course of some weeks firmly fixed in the pupil's memory. So much the worse ; all these names will disturb him if he have common sense, and at every step must stop his progress. To begin with the vowels ; each of these...
Page 135 - ... about the matter; and I was soon cajoled by a plausible artful fellow to venture my whole stock in it. The business was a manufacture, about which I knew nothing at all; but as I was not afraid of my labour, I set about working as they directed me, with great diligence, and thought all was going on prosperously. One morning, on coming to the office, I found my partners decamped ; and the same day I was arrested for a considerable sum due by the partnership. It was in vain for me to think of getting...
Page 130 - He said nothing to him at the time, but in the afternoon he took him a walk into a neighbouring parish. There was a large wild common, and at the skirts of it a neat farm-house, with fields lying round it, all well fenced, and cultivated in the best manner. The air was sweetened with the bean-flower and clover. An orchard of fine young fruit-trees lay behind the house ; and before it was a little garden, gay with all the flowers of the season.
Page 139 - ... soon as we had got some necessaries, and the weather was tolerable, we set out on our long march. My wife carried her infant in her arms. I took the bigger child on my back, and a bundle of clothes in my hand. We could walk but a few miles a day, but we now and then got a lift in an empty waggon or cart, which was a great help to us. One day we met with a farmer returning with his team from market, who let us ride, and entered into conversation with me.
Page 139 - ... our late maid-servant, who insisted upon our accepting of a crown which she had saved out of her wages. Poor soul ! we had always treated her like one of ourselves, and she felt for us like one. As soon as we had got some necessaries, and the weather was tolerable, we set out on our long march. My wife carried her infant in her arms.. I took the bigger child on my back, and a bundle of clothes in my hand. We could walk...
Page 137 - I could; and, by the kindness of my landlord, was enabled to bring things tolerably about again. We regained our health, and began to be seasoned to the climate. As we were cheering ourselves with the prospect of better times, a dreadful storm arose — it was one night in February — I shall never forget it — and drove the spring-tide with such fury against our sea-banks, that they gave way. The water rushed in with such force, that all was presently at sea. Two hours before daylight I was awakened...

Bibliographic information